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Why is this happening to me? – a comparison of illness representations between Iranian and German people with mental illness

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Why is this happening to me? – a comparison of illness representations between Iranian and German people with mental illness
Published in
BMC Psychology, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40359-018-0250-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Judith Reichardt, Amrollah Ebrahimi, Hamid Nasiri Dehsorkhi, Ricarda Mewes, Cornelia Weise, Hamid Afshar, Peyman Adibi, Said Moshref Dehkordy, Gholamreza Yeganeh, Hanna Reich, Winfried Rief

Abstract

Due to an increase in migration and globalization, cross-cultural encounters in health care are also becoming more frequent. As psychotherapy is grounded in a cultural context and must be congruent with the patient's cultural beliefs of his or her illness in order to be effective, the consideration of cross-cultural differences in illness representations becomes increasingly important. Especially research on illness representations concerning mental disorders is scarce. The aim of the current study was to compare illness representations between Iranian (N = 87) and German (N = 90) patient samples as well as subclinical samples (Iranian N = 264, German N = 102) using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Illness representations were measured using the Illness Perception Questionnaire Revised (IPQ-R). Initially, a factor analysis was conducted in order to ensure comparability of the IPQ-R between the Iranian and the German sample. The factor analysis already revealed differences in item compositions of the IPQ-R subscales indicating differences of the conception of illness representations between the samples. Further, the Iranian samples showed a significantly higher amount of supernatural causal beliefs and emotional representation of the illness than the German samples. Surprisingly, the Iranian patient sample showed the highest amount of illness coherence. The current paper contributes to a deeper understanding of cross-cultural differences in illness representations regarding mental disorders. Nevertheless, further research is needed to confirm current findings and to further elaborate on the relationships found.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 6 40%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Unspecified 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 33%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 7%
Mathematics 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2018.
All research outputs
#2,206,901
of 14,756,732 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#114
of 351 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,303
of 274,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,756,732 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 351 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,644 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them