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Cardiac dose reduction with deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy patients with and without regional nodal irradiation

Overview of attention for article published in Radiation Oncology, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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70 Dimensions

Readers on

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94 Mendeley
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Title
Cardiac dose reduction with deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy patients with and without regional nodal irradiation
Published in
Radiation Oncology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13014-015-0511-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosanna Yeung, Leigh Conroy, Karen Long, Daphne Walrath, Haocheng Li, Wendy Smith, Alana Hudson, Tien Phan

Abstract

Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) reduces heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) dose during left-sided breast radiation therapy (RT); however there is limited information about which patients derive the most benefit from DIBH. The primary objective of this study was to determine which patients benefit the most from DIBH by comparing percent reduction in mean cardiac dose conferred by DIBH for patients treated with whole breast RT ± boost (WBRT) versus those receiving breast/chest wall plus regional nodal irradiation, including internal mammary chain (IMC) nodes (B/CWRT + RNI) using a modified wide tangent technique. A secondary objective was to determine if DIBH was required to meet a proposed heart dose constraint of Dmean < 4 Gy in these two cohorts. Twenty consecutive patients underwent CT simulation both free breathing (FB) and DIBH. Patients were grouped into two cohorts: WBRT (n = 11) and B/CWRT + RNI (n = 9). 3D-conformal plans were developed and FB was compared to DIBH for each cohort using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests for continuous variables and McNemar's test for discrete variables. The percent relative reduction conferred by DIBH in mean heart and LAD dose, as well as lung V20 were compared between the two cohorts using Wilcox rank-sum testing. The significance level was set at 0.05 with Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. All patients had comparable target coverage on DIBH and FB. DIBH statistically significantly reduced mean heart and LAD dose for both cohorts. Percent reduction in mean heart and LAD dose with DIBH was significantly larger in the B/CWRT + RNI cohort compared to WBRT group (relative reduction in mean heart and LAD dose: 55.9 % and 72.1 % versus 29.2 % and 43.5 %, p < 0.02). All patients in the WBRT group and five patients (56 %) in the B/CWBRT + RNI group met heart Dmean <4 Gy with FB. All patients met this constraint with DIBH. All patients receiving WBRT met Dmean Heart < 4 Gy on FB, while only slightly over half of patients receiving B/CWRT + RNI were able to meet this constraint in FB. DIBH allowed a greater reduction in mean heart and LAD dose in patients receiving B/CWRT + RNI, including IMC nodes than patients receiving WBRT. These findings suggest greatest benefit from DIBH treatment for patients receiving regional nodal irradiation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Slovenia 1 1%
Unknown 93 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 16%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 18 19%
Unknown 18 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 17%
Physics and Astronomy 8 9%
Engineering 3 3%
Psychology 1 1%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 26 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2015.
All research outputs
#4,147,833
of 9,722,866 outputs
Outputs from Radiation Oncology
#207
of 1,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,812
of 242,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Radiation Oncology
#11
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,722,866 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,177 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,082 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.