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Postextubation laryngeal edema and stridor resulting in respiratory failure in critically ill adult patients: updated review

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
3 blogs
twitter
109 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
191 Mendeley
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Title
Postextubation laryngeal edema and stridor resulting in respiratory failure in critically ill adult patients: updated review
Published in
Critical Care, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13054-015-1018-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wouter A. Pluijms, Walther NKA van Mook, Bastiaan HJ Wittekamp, Dennis CJJ Bergmans

Abstract

Endotracheal intubation is frequently complicated by laryngeal edema, which may present as postextubation stridor or respiratory difficulty or both. Ultimately, postextubation laryngeal edema may result in respiratory failure with subsequent reintubation. Risk factors for postextubation laryngeal edema include female gender, large tube size, and prolonged intubation. Although patients at low risk for postextubation respiratory insufficiency due to laryngeal edema can be identified by the cuff leak test or laryngeal ultrasound, no reliable test for the identification of high-risk patients is currently available. If applied in a timely manner, intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids can prevent postextubation laryngeal edema; however, the inability to identify high-risk patients prevents the targeted pretreatment of these patients. Therefore, the decision to start corticosteroids should be made on an individual basis and on the basis of the outcome of the cuff leak test and additional risk factors. The preferential treatment of postextubation laryngeal edema consists of intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids combined with nebulized epinephrine, although no data on the optimal treatment algorithm are available. In the presence of respiratory failure, reintubation should be performed without delay. Application of noninvasive ventilation or inhalation of a helium/oxygen mixture is not indicated since it does not improve outcome and increases the delay to intubation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 109 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 191 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 1%
Italy 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Unknown 184 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 32 17%
Student > Postgraduate 30 16%
Researcher 22 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 9%
Student > Bachelor 16 8%
Other 44 23%
Unknown 30 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 129 68%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 1%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 <1%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 37 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 84. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2020.
All research outputs
#306,827
of 17,794,941 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#208
of 5,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,830
of 256,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#2
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,794,941 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,368 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,699 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.