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Gene expression changes in the salivary glands of Anopheles coluzzii elicited by Plasmodium berghei infection

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
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3 tweeters

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Gene expression changes in the salivary glands of Anopheles coluzzii elicited by Plasmodium berghei infection
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1079-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Renato Pinheiro-Silva, Lara Borges, Luís Pedro Coelho, Alejandro Cabezas-Cruz, James J. Valdés, Virgílio do Rosário, José de la Fuente, Ana Domingos

Abstract

Malaria is a devastating infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites transmitted through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Salivary glands are the only mosquito tissue invaded by Plasmodium sporozoites, being a key stage for the effective parasite transmission, making the study of Anopheles sialome highly relevant. RNA-sequencing was used to compare differential gene expression in salivary glands of uninfected and Plasmodium berghei-infected Anopheles coluzzii mosquitoes. RNA-seq results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. The transmembrane glucose transporter gene AGAP007752 was selected for functional analysis by RNA interference. The effect of gene silencing on infection level was evaluated. The putative function and tertiary structure of the protein was assessed. RNA-seq data showed that 2588 genes were differentially expressed in mosquitoes salivary glands in response to P. berghei infection, being 1578 upregulated and 1010 downregulated. Metabolism, Immunity, Replication/Transcription/Translation, Proteolysis and Transport were the mosquito gene functional classes more affected by parasite infection. Endopeptidase coding genes were the most abundant within the differentially expressed genes in infected salivary glands (P < 0.001). Based on its putative function and expression level, the transmembrane glucose transporter gene, AGAP007752, was selected for functional analysis by RNA interference. The results demonstrated that the number of sporozoites was 44.3 % lower in mosquitoes fed on infected mice after AGAPP007752 gene knockdown when compared to control (P < 0.01). Our hypothesis is that the protein encoded by the gene AGAPP007752 may play a role on An. coluzzii salivary glands infection by Plasmodium parasite, working as a sporozoite receptor and/or promoting a favorable environment for the capacity of sporozoites.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Ghana 1 2%
Unknown 60 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 25%
Student > Master 13 21%
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 13 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2015.
All research outputs
#10,249,884
of 16,638,522 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#2,371
of 4,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,710
of 251,829 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,638,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,435 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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