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Elective egg freezing and its underlying socio-demography: a binational analysis with global implications

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 800)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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46 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Elective egg freezing and its underlying socio-demography: a binational analysis with global implications
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12958-018-0389-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. C. Inhorn, D. Birenbaum-Carmeli, J. Birger, L. M. Westphal, J. Doyle, N. Gleicher, D. Meirow, M. Dirnfeld, D. Seidman, A. Kahane, P. Patrizio

Abstract

What are the underlying socio-demographic factors that lead healthy women to preserve their fertility through elective egg freezing (EEF)? Many recent reviews suggest that women are intentionally postponing fertility through EEF to pursue careers and achieve reproductive autonomy. However, emerging empirical evidence suggests that women may be resorting to EEF for other reasons, primarily the lack of a partner with whom to pursue childbearing. The aim of this study is thus to understand what socio-demographic factors may underlie women's use of EEF. A binational qualitative study was conducted from June 2014 to August 2016 to assess the socio-demographic characteristics and life circumstances of 150 healthy women who had undertaken at least one cycle of elective egg freezing (EEF) in the United States and Israel, two countries where EEF has been offered in IVF clinics over the past 7-8 years. One hundred fourteen American women who completed EEF were recruited from 4 IVF clinics in the US (2 academic, 2 private) and 36 women from 3 IVF clinics in Israel (1 academic, 2 private). In-depth, audio-recorded interviews lasting from 0.5 to 2 h were undertaken and later transcribed verbatim for qualitative data analysis. Women in both countries were educated professionals (100%), and 85% undertook EEF because they lacked a partner. This "lack of a partner" problem was reflected in women's own assessments of why they were single in their late 30s, despite their desires for marriage and childbearing. Women themselves assessed partnership problems from four perspectives: 1) women's higher expectations; 2) men's lower commitments; 3) skewed gender demography; and 4) self-blame. The "lack of a partner" problem reflects growing, but little discussed international socio-demographic disparities in educational achievement. University-educated women now significantly outnumber university-educated men in the US, Israel, and nearly 75 other societies around the globe, according to World Bank data. Thus, educated women increasingly face a deficit of educated men with whom to pursue childbearing. Among healthy women, EEF is a technological concession to gender-based socio-demographic disparities, which leave many highly educated women without partners during their prime childbearing years. This information is important for reproductive specialists who counsel single EEF patients, and for future research on EEF in diverse national settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 16%
Other 5 10%
Researcher 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 16 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 28%
Social Sciences 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 19 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 60. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2021.
All research outputs
#486,959
of 19,584,195 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#21
of 800 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,010
of 294,381 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,584,195 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 800 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,381 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them