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Reproductive health knowledge among college students in Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
146 Mendeley
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Title
Reproductive health knowledge among college students in Kenya
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5760-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samuel Mungai Mbugua, Jane Muthoni Karonjo

Abstract

Reproductive health knowledge is vital in the growth and development of young people and this impact greatly on their educational and personal outcome as they proceed to adulthood. There has been an increasing occurrence of sexually transmitted infections in institutions of higher learning. The study sought out the strategies used by university students to prevent unplanned pregnancy and determined their knowledge of contraception methods and sexually transmitted infections in Mount Kenya University, main campus. Stratified sampling was employed. After a signed consent was obtained, a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were explored, analyzed and percentages used to quantify the level of knowledge. Pearson's chi-square was used to measure associations between categorical variables and independent t-test used to measure the means and relationships of continuous variables. Condom use was established as the most prevalent strategy in prevention of unplanned pregnancy at 48.5 and 46.4% in prevention of STI and HIV/AIDS. Almost two thirds (58%) of respondents reported that they were conversant with only one method of contraception, 60% had knowledge of more than two types of STIs, and 62.4% indicated that they were conversant with only hospitals as facilities providing reproductive health services. Young people in college require educational initiatives to sensitize them on STI, methods of contraception and positive social behaviors. There is need to improve the accessibility of reproductive health services through strengthening of services provided at campus health clinics.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 146 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Unspecified 11 8%
Researcher 11 8%
Lecturer 10 7%
Other 32 22%
Unknown 43 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 28 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 16%
Social Sciences 15 10%
Unspecified 12 8%
Psychology 6 4%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 46 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2021.
All research outputs
#851,473
of 21,316,546 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#896
of 13,805 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,714
of 298,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,316,546 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,805 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,769 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.