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Does texting while walking really affect gait in young adults?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, September 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

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13 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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59 Dimensions

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157 Mendeley
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Title
Does texting while walking really affect gait in young adults?
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12984-015-0079-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valentina Agostini, Francesco Lo Fermo, Giuseppe Massazza, Marco Knaflitz

Abstract

Texting on a smartphone while walking has become a customary task among young adults. In recent literature many safety concerns on distracted walking have been raised. It is often hypothesized that the allocation of attentional resources toward a secondary task can influence dynamic stability. In the double task of walking and texting it was found that gait speed is reduced, but there is scarce evidence of a modified motor control strategy compromising stability. The aim of this study is twofold: 1) to comprehensively examine the gait modifications occurring when texting while walking, including the study of the lower limb muscle activation patterns, 2) to specifically assess the co-contraction of ankle antagonist muscles. We hypothesized that texting while walking increases co-contractions of ankle antagonist muscles when the body weight is transferred from one lower limb to the other, to improve the distal motor control and joint stabilization. From the gait data collected during an instrumented walk lasting 3 min, we calculated the spatio-temporal parameters, the ankle and knee kinematics, the muscle activation patterns of tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius lateralis, peroneus longus, rectus femoris, and lateral hamstrings, and the co-contraction (occurrence and duration) of the ankle antagonist muscles (tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius lateralis), bilaterally. Young adults showed, overall, small gait modifications that could be mainly ascribable to gait speed reduction and a modified body posture due to phone handling. We found no significant alterations of ankle and knee kinematics and a slightly delayed activation onset of the left gastrocnemius lateralis. However, we found an increased co-contraction of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius lateralis, especially during mid-stance. Conversely, we found a reduced co-contraction during terminal stance. Our results suggest that, in young adults, there is an adjustment of the motor control strategy aimed at increasing ankle joint stability in a specific and "critical" phase of the gait cycle, when the body weight is transferred from one leg to the other.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 153 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 20%
Student > Bachelor 31 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 14%
Researcher 13 8%
Other 8 5%
Other 27 17%
Unknown 25 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 32 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 11%
Sports and Recreations 11 7%
Psychology 10 6%
Other 26 17%
Unknown 37 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2020.
All research outputs
#2,761,589
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#175
of 1,077 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,386
of 255,108 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,077 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,108 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.