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The first report of Cryptosporidium andersoni in horses with diarrhea and multilocus subtype analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
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Title
The first report of Cryptosporidium andersoni in horses with diarrhea and multilocus subtype analysis
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1102-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aiqin Liu, Jia Zhang, Jingmin Zhao, Wei Zhao, Rongjun Wang, Longxian Zhang

Abstract

Horses interact with humans in a wide variety of sport competitions and non-competitive recreational pursuits as well as in working activities. Cryptosporidium spp are one of the most important zoonotic pathogens causing diarrhea of humans and animals. The reports of Cryptosporidium in horses and the findings of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species/genotypes show a necessity to carry out molecular identification of Cryptosporidium in horses, especially in diarrheic ones. The aim of the present study was to understand Cryptosporidium infection and species/genotypes in diarrheic horses, and to trace the source of infection of horse-derived Cryptosporidium isolates at a subtype level. Fecal specimens of 29 diarrheic adult horses were collected in Taikang County in northeastern China's Heilongjiang Province. Cryptosporidium oocysts were concentrated by Sheather's sugar flotation technique, and then examined by a bright-field microscope. Meanwhile, all the specimens were subjected to PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium. C. andersoni isolates were further subtyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16). One and two Cryptosporidium-positive isolates were obtained in horses by microscopy and by PCR, respectively. The two C. andersoni isolates were identified by sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium. Both of them were identical to each other at the MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16 loci, and MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 was found here. This is the first report of C. andersoni in horses. The fact that the MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 was reported in cattle suggests a large possibility of transmission of C. andersoni between cattle and horses.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 5%
Mexico 1 5%
Unknown 20 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 23%
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Professor 2 9%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 27%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2016.
All research outputs
#7,047,483
of 8,137,857 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,936
of 2,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,248
of 237,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#127
of 148 outputs
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