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Influence of protein concentration and quality in a canned diet on urine composition, apparent nutrient digestibility and energy supply in adult cats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, July 2018
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3 tweeters

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Influence of protein concentration and quality in a canned diet on urine composition, apparent nutrient digestibility and energy supply in adult cats
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12917-018-1517-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadine Paßlack, Barbara Kohn, Marcus G. Doherr, Jürgen Zentek

Abstract

Protein concentration and quality in cat food can vary considerably, and the impact on feline urine composition and nutrient supply is of high practical relevance. In the present study, 6 canned diets with varying protein concentrations and qualities were fed to 10 healthy adult cats. Protein quality in the diet differed depending on the amount of collagen-rich ingredients. Hydroxyproline concentrations were 2.56-4.45 g/kg dry matter in the high quality and 3.76-9.44 g/kg dry matter in the low quality diets. Protein levels were 36.2, 43.3 and 54.9% in the high quality and 36.7, 45.0 and 56.1% in the low quality groups. Each diet was fed for 6 weeks, using a randomized cross-over design. In the last 2 weeks of each feeding period, urine and faeces of the cats were collected. Renal calcium (Ca), oxalate (Ox) and citrate excretion were unaffected by the dietary protein concentration, possibly mediated by a high urine volume (24.2-34.2 ml/kg bodyweight (BW)/day) in all groups. However, renal Ox excretion was lower when the high quality diets were fed (P = 0.013). Urinary relative supersaturation (RSS) with calcium oxalate (CaOx) was low in general, but reduced in the high quality groups (P = 0.031). Urinary RSS values for magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) were high (2.64-5.00) among all groups. Apparent digestibility of crude protein and most minerals was unaffected by the different diets. Feed intake was higher in the low quality groups (P = 0.026), but BW of the cats did not differ depending on dietary protein quality. BW of the cats increased with increasing dietary protein concentrations (P = 0.003). In conclusion, a high protein canned diet might not be a specific risk factor for CaOx urolith formation in cats. In contrast, all diets resulted in high RSS MAP values, which might be critical concerning MAP crystallization. Protein quality had a minor, but significant impact on urine composition, necessitating further research on this subject. A lower energy supply when feeding a low protein quality can be assumed. Changes in BW were only small and require a careful interpretation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 6 22%
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Librarian 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 11 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Linguistics 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,385,403
of 13,384,293 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#901
of 1,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,207
of 268,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#8
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,293 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,961 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.