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Prevalence and personal attitudes towards tobacco smoking among Palestinian healthcare professionals: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, July 2018
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Title
Prevalence and personal attitudes towards tobacco smoking among Palestinian healthcare professionals: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13722-018-0119-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isra Y. Mizher, Shahd I. Fawaqa, Waleed M. Sweileh

Abstract

Little is known about tobacco smoking behaviors of healthcare professionals in the Middle East where stress conditions are high and tobacco smoking regulations are either absent or loose. The objective of this study was to identify the prevalence of and attitudes toward tobacco smoking among healthcare professionals. Trained senior medical students conducted a cross-sectional survey study in all governmental and non-governmental hospitals in Nablus city (Palestine) using a self-administered questionnaire containing both open-and closed-ended questions. In total, 708 healthcare professionals participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 31.4 ± 9.6 years. Forty-five (6.4%) participants were ex-smokers, 419 (59.2%) were never smokers, and 244 (34.5%) were current tobacco smokers. One hundred and forty-two (58.2%) tobacco smokers reported that they smoke inside the hospital and 119 (48.8%) reported that they think of quitting smoking. Univariate analysis indicated that age, gender, marital status, family history of tobacco smoking, country of graduation, and night shifts were significantly associated with tobacco smoking status. No significant difference (p = 0.156) in prevalence of tobacco smoking was found between physicians and other healthcare professionals. Binary logistic regression indicated that older age, male gender, and having a positive family history of smoking were significant predictors of being a current tobacco smoker. Non-smokers had significantly higher frequency of patient counseling than current smokers. Palestinian healthcare professionals have relatively higher prevalence of tobacco smoking compared to the general population. Urgent national intervention and strict implementation of "No Smoking Law" in health institutions and in public places are needed to root out this negative behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Professor 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 16 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Psychology 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 18 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2018.
All research outputs
#10,156,588
of 13,304,005 outputs
Outputs from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#213
of 238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,377
of 268,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#2
of 2 outputs
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