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All-cause mortality effects of replacing sedentary time with physical activity and sleeping using an isotemporal substitution model: a prospective study of 201,129 mid-aged and older adults

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#35 of 1,834)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
68 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
39 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
106 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
196 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
All-cause mortality effects of replacing sedentary time with physical activity and sleeping using an isotemporal substitution model: a prospective study of 201,129 mid-aged and older adults
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0280-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emmanuel Stamatakis, Kris Rogers, Ding, David Berrigan, Josephine Chau, Mark Hamer, Adrian Bauman

Abstract

Sedentary behaviour, sleeping, and physical activity are thought to be independently associated with health outcomes but it is unclear whether these associations are due to the direct physiological effects of each behaviour or because, across a finite 24-hour day, engagement in one behavior requires displacement of another. The aim of this study was to examine the replacement effects of sedentary behaviour (total sitting, television/computer screen time combined), sleeping, standing, walking, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on all-cause mortality using isotemporal substitution modelling. Longitudinal analysis (4.22 ± 0 · 9 years follow-up/849,369 person-years) of 201,129 participants of the 45 and Up study aged ≥45 years from New South Wales, Australia. Seven thousand four hundred and sixty deaths occurred over follow-up. There were beneficial associations for replacing total sitting time with standing (per-hour HR: 95 % CI: 0.95, 0.94-0.96), walking (0.86, 0.81-0.90), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (0.88, 0.85-0.90), and sleeping in those sleeping ≤ 7 h/day (0.94, 0.90-0.98). Similar associations were noted for replacing screen time. Replacing one hour of walking or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with any other activity class was associated with an increased mortality risk by 7-18 %. Excluding deaths in the first 24 months of the follow up and restricting analyses to those who were healthy at baseline did not materially change the above observations. Although replacing sedentary behaviour with walking and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity are associated with the lowest mortality risk, replacements with equal amounts of standing and sleeping (in low sleepers only) are also linked to substantial mortality risk reductions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 68 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 196 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 191 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 17%
Student > Master 31 16%
Researcher 26 13%
Student > Bachelor 18 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 8%
Other 34 17%
Unknown 38 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 22%
Sports and Recreations 27 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 10%
Psychology 12 6%
Social Sciences 11 6%
Other 28 14%
Unknown 54 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 205. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2019.
All research outputs
#134,821
of 21,201,318 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#35
of 1,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,020
of 264,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,201,318 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,834 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,202 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.