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Evidence for temporal population replacement and the signature of ecological adaptation in a major Neotropical malaria vector in Amazonian Peru

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

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81 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence for temporal population replacement and the signature of ecological adaptation in a major Neotropical malaria vector in Amazonian Peru
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0863-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

William Lainhart, Sara A. Bickersmith, Kyle J. Nadler, Marta Moreno, Marlon P. Saavedra, Virginia M. Chu, Paulo E. Ribolla, Joseph M. Vinetz, Jan E. Conn

Abstract

The major Neotropical malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi, was reintroduced into the Iquitos, Loreto, Peru area during the early 1990s, where it displaced other anophelines and caused a major malaria epidemic. Since then, case numbers in Loreto have fluctuated, but annual increases have been reported since 2012. The population genetic structure of An. darlingi sampled before and after the introduction of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) was investigated to test the hypothesis of temporal population change (2006 vs. 2012). Current samples of An. darlingi were used to test the hypothesis of ecological adaptation to human modified (highway) compared with wild (riverine) habitat, linked to forest cover. In total, 693 An. darlingi from nine localities in Loreto, Peru area were genotyped using 13 microsatellite loci. To test the hypothesis of habitat differentiation in An. darlingi biting time patterns, HBR and EIR, four collections of An. darlingi from five localities (two riverine and three highway) were analysed. Analyses of microsatellite loci from seven (2006) and nine settlements (2012-2014) in the Iquitos area detected two distinctive populations with little overlap, although it is unclear whether this population replacement event is associated with LLIN distribution or climate. Within the 2012-2014 population two admixed subpopulations, A and B, were differentiated by habitat, with B significantly overrepresented in highway, and both in near-equal proportions in riverine. Both subpopulations had a signature of expansion and there was moderate genetic differentiation between them. Habitat and forest cover level had significant effects on HBR, such that Plasmodium transmission risk, as measured by EIR, in peridomestic riverine settlements was threefold higher than in peridomestic highway settlements. HBR was directly associated with available host biomass rather than forest cover. A population replacement event occurred between 2006 and 2012-2014, concurrently with LLIN distribution and a moderate El Niño event, and prior to an increase in malaria incidence. The likely drivers of this replacement cannot be determined with current data. The present-day An. darlingi population is composed of two highly admixed subpopulations, which appear to be in an early stage of differentiation, triggered by anthropogenic alterations to local habitat.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 1%
Ecuador 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 77 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 21%
Researcher 17 21%
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Professor 4 5%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 9 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 10%
Environmental Science 7 9%
Engineering 6 7%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2019.
All research outputs
#10,196,856
of 15,999,693 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,522
of 4,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,184
of 251,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,999,693 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,512 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,364 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them