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See One, Do One, Order One: a study protocol for cluster randomized controlled trial testing three strategies for implementing motivational interviewing on medical inpatient units

Overview of attention for article published in Implementation Science, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
93 Mendeley
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Title
See One, Do One, Order One: a study protocol for cluster randomized controlled trial testing three strategies for implementing motivational interviewing on medical inpatient units
Published in
Implementation Science, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13012-015-0327-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steve Martino, Paula Zimbrean, Ariadna Forray, Joy Kaufman, Paul Desan, Todd A. Olmstead, Ralitza Gueorguieva, Heather Howell, Ashley McCaherty, Kimberly A. Yonkers

Abstract

General medical hospitals provide care for a disproportionate share of patients who abuse or are dependent upon substances. This group is among the most costly to treat and has the poorest medical and addiction recovery outcomes. Hospitalization provides a unique opportunity to identify and motivate patients to address their substance use problems in that patients are accessible, have time for an intervention, and are often admitted for complications related to substance use that renders hospitalization a "teachable moment." This randomized controlled trial will examine the effectiveness of three different strategies for integrating motivational interviewing (MI) into the practice of providers working within a general medical inpatient hospitalist service: (1) a continuing medical education workshop that provides background and "shows" providers how to conduct MI (See One); (2) an apprenticeship model involving workshop training plus live supervision of bedside practice (Do One); and (3) ordering MI from the psychiatry consultation-liaison (CL) service after learning about it in a workshop (Order One). Thirty providers (physicians, physician assistants, nurses) will be randomized to conditions and then assessed for their provision of MI to 40 study-eligible inpatients. The primary aims of the study are to assess (1) the utilization of MI in each condition; (2) the integrity of MI when providers use it on the medical units; and (3) the relative costs and cost-effectiveness of the three different implementation strategies. If implementation of Do One and Order One is successful, the field will have two alternative strategies for supporting medical providers' proficient use of brief behavioral interventions, such as MI, for medical inpatients who use substances problematically. Clinical Trials.gov ( NCT01825057 ).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Unknown 91 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 17%
Student > Master 13 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Other 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 5%
Other 20 22%
Unknown 20 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 18%
Psychology 9 10%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 22 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2015.
All research outputs
#3,787,209
of 19,751,974 outputs
Outputs from Implementation Science
#820
of 1,643 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,484
of 261,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Implementation Science
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,751,974 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,643 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,649 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.