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Factors impacting the quality of peer relationships of youth with Tourette’s syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, September 2015
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1 peer review site

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11 Dimensions

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Factors impacting the quality of peer relationships of youth with Tourette’s syndrome
Published in
BMC Psychology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40359-015-0090-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deirdre O’Hare, Valsamma Eapen, Edward Helmes, Kerry McBain, John Reece, Rachel Grove

Abstract

Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a poorly understood neurodevelopmental disorder consistently associated with impaired peer relationships. This research aimed to investigate the relationship between TS and the ability of diagnosed youth to form secure attachment relationships with peers. A quantitative study examined differences between youth with TS and typically developing peers in social functioning, relationship problems and attachment security. Qualitative studies sought to identify factors that enhanced or impeded the ability to form secure peer relationships, including the impact of tic severity, comorbidity and personality traits. All research was conducted from the parental perspective. The research consisted of a controlled, survey-based qualitative and quantitative study (Study One) of parents of youth with TS (n = 86) and control group peers (n = 108), and a qualitative telephone interview-based study of TS group parents (Study Two, n = 22). Quantitative assessment of social functioning, peer problems and peer attachment security was conducted using the Paediatric Quality of Life inventory, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Attachment Questionnaire for Children. Qualitative data relating to personality was classified using the Five Factor Model. Results revealed significantly higher rates of insecure peer attachment, problems in peer relationships, difficulty making friends, stigmatisation and lower levels of social functioning for the TS group. Significant between-group differences in number and type of factors impacting peer relationships were also determined with 'personality' emerging as the most prevalent factor. Whilst Extraversion and Agreeableness facilitated friendships for both groups, higher rates of Neuroticism were barriers to friendship for individuals with TS. The TS group also identified multiple 'non-personality' factors impacting peer relationships, including TS and comorbid symptom severity, the child's psychological and behavioural adjustment to their disorder, coping strategies and the behaviour and attitudes of peers. Our findings suggest that, whilst Extraversion and Agreeableness facilitated friendships for both groups, higher rates of Neuroticism were barriers to friendship for individuals with TS. Notwithstanding the fact that these findings are based on parental report and not the perceptions of youth themselves, this study may help clinicians to identify youth at increased risk of developing insecure peer relationships and guide the development of targeted supports. The findings from the study may help clinicians, parents and individuals with TS to better understand and cope with the difficulties experienced in interactions with peers.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 13 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 15 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,115,891
of 11,426,369 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#180
of 224 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,128
of 243,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#7
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,426,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 224 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.0. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.