↓ Skip to main content

A case of Naegleria fowleri related primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in China diagnosed by next-generation sequencing

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A case of Naegleria fowleri related primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in China diagnosed by next-generation sequencing
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3261-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiang Wang, Jianming Li, Jingkai Ji, Liuqing Yang, Li Chen, Rongrong Zhou, Yang, Haixia Zheng, Jing Yuan, Liqiang Li, Yuhai Bi, George F. Gao, Jinmin Ma, Yingxia Liu

Abstract

Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), caused by Naegleria fowleri, is a rare protozoan infectious disease in China. A fatality rate of over 95% had been reported due to extremely rapid disease progression in the USA and other countries. Rapid and precise identification of the causative agent is very important to clinicians for guiding their choices for administering countermeasures in the clinic. In this report, we applied the next-generation sequencing (NGS) method to rapidly show that N. fowleri was the causative agent of a fatal case involving a 42-year-old man with severe PAM disease, the first reported in mainland China. A 42-year old male in a deep coma was admitted to Shenzhen Third People's Hospital, a special medical care unit with expertise in infectious diseases. Increased intracranial pressure was detected. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample was found to be red and cloudy with increased leukocyte and protein levels. While bacterial cultures with CSF were negative, N. fowleri was determined to be the causative agent with NGS. Amphotericin B (AmB), a drug with anti-amoeba activity, was used immediately, but the treatment came too late and the patient died 2 days after the NGS confirmation. In this paper, we reported a case of PAM disease for the first time in mainland China. NGS was used for rapid diagnosis and provided guidance for prescribing medications. However, the patient died due to a late admission amid advanced PAM disease. Early detection of N. fowleri is necessary in order to select effective drug treatments and control the disease progression. Despite the negative survival outcome, NGS was shown to be a promising method of rapid and precise identification of N. fowleri.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 29%
Student > Master 8 16%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 12%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,169,698
of 13,322,622 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,152
of 4,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,084
of 268,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,322,622 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,957 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,290 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them