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Measuring health-relevant businesses over 21 years: refining the National Establishment Time-Series (NETS), a dynamic longitudinal data set

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, September 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Measuring health-relevant businesses over 21 years: refining the National Establishment Time-Series (NETS), a dynamic longitudinal data set
Published in
BMC Research Notes, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1482-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tanya K. Kaufman, Daniel M. Sheehan, Andrew Rundle, Kathryn M. Neckerman, Michael D. M. Bader, Darby Jack, Gina S. Lovasi

Abstract

The densities of food retailers, alcohol outlets, physical activity facilities, and medical facilities have been associated with diet, physical activity, and management of medical conditions. Most of the research, however, has relied on cross-sectional studies. In this paper, we assess methodological issues raised by a data source that is increasingly used to characterize change in the local business environment: the National Establishment Time Series (NETS) dataset. Longitudinal data, such as NETS, offer opportunities to assess how differential access to resources impacts population health, to consider correlations among multiple environmental influences across the life course, and to gain a better understanding of their interactions and cumulative health effects. Longitudinal data also introduce new data management, geoprocessing, and business categorization challenges. Examining geocoding accuracy and categorization over 21 years of data in 23 counties surrounding New York City (NY, USA), we find that health-related business environments change considerably over time. We note that re-geocoding data may improve spatial precision, particularly in early years. Our intent with this paper is to make future public health applications of NETS data more efficient, since the size and complexity of the data can be difficult to exploit fully within its 2-year data-licensing period. Further, standardized approaches to NETS and other "big data" will facilitate the veracity and comparability of results across studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 30 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 28%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Professor 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 7 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 10 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,774,114
of 6,297,749 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#787
of 1,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,767
of 198,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#66
of 170 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,297,749 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,787 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,318 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 170 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.