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Costs of HIV/AIDS treatment in Indonesia by time of treatment and stage of disease

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2015
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Title
Costs of HIV/AIDS treatment in Indonesia by time of treatment and stage of disease
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-1098-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adiatma Y. M. Siregar, Noor Tromp, Dindin Komarudin, Rudi Wisaksana, Reinout van Crevel, Andre van der Ven, Rob Baltussen

Abstract

We report an economic analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) care and treatment in Indonesia to assess the options and limitations of costs reduction, improving access, and scaling up services. We calculated the cost of providing HIV care and treatment in a main referral hospital in West Java, Indonesia from 2008 to 2010, differentiated by initiation of treatment at different CD4 cell count levels (0-50, 50-100, 100-150, 150-200, and >200 cells/mm(3)); time of treatment; HIV care and opportunistic infections cost components; and the costs of patients for seeking and undergoing care. Before antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation, costs were dominated by laboratory tests (>65 %), and after initiation, by antiretroviral drugs (≥60 %). Average treatment costs per patient decreased with time on treatment (e.g. from US$580 per patient in the first 6 month to US$473 per patient in months 19-24 for those with CD4 cell counts under 50 cells/mm(3)). Higher CD4 cell counts at initiation resulted in lower laboratory and opportunistic infection treatment costs. Transportation cost dominated the costs of patients for seeking and undergoing care (>40 %). Costs of providing ART are highest during the early phase of treatment. Costs reductions can potentially be realized by early treatment initiation and applying alternative laboratory tests with caution. Scaling up ART at the community level in certain high prevalence settings may improve early uptake, adherence, and reduce transportation costs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 117 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 25%
Student > Bachelor 19 16%
Lecturer 11 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 9%
Researcher 9 8%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 27 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 24 21%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 17 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 15%
Social Sciences 9 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 6%
Other 14 12%
Unknown 29 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2015.
All research outputs
#18,224,839
of 22,560,481 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#6,379
of 7,514 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,082
of 266,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,560,481 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,514 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them