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Risk markers for suicidality in autistic adults

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 614)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
606 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
120 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
274 Mendeley
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Title
Risk markers for suicidality in autistic adults
Published in
Molecular Autism, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13229-018-0226-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Cassidy, Louise Bradley, Rebecca Shaw, Simon Baron-Cohen

Abstract

Research has shown high rates of suicidality in autism spectrum conditions (ASC), but there is lack of research into why this is the case. Many common experiences of autistic adults, such as depression or unemployment, overlap with known risk markers for suicide in the general population. However, it is unknown whether there are risk markers unique to ASC that require new tailored suicide prevention strategies. Through consultation with a steering group of autistic adults, a survey was developed aiming to identify unique risk markers for suicidality in this group. The survey measured suicidality (SBQ-R), non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI-AT), mental health problems, unmet support needs, employment, satisfaction with living arrangements, self-reported autistic traits (AQ), delay in ASC diagnosis, and 'camouflaging' ASC. One hundred sixty-four autistic adults (65 male, 99 female) and 169 general population adults (54 males, 115 females) completed the survey online. A majority of autistic adults (72%) scored above the recommended psychiatric cut-off for suicide risk on the SBQ-R; significantly higher than general population (GP) adults (33%). After statistically controlling for a range of demographics and diagnoses, ASC diagnosis and self-reported autistic traits in the general population significantly predicted suicidality. In autistic adults, non-suicidal self-injury, camouflaging, and number of unmet support needs significantly predicted suicidality. Results confirm previously reported high rates of suicidality in ASC, and demonstrate that ASC diagnosis, and self-reported autistic traits in the general population are independent risk markers for suicidality. This suggests there are unique factors associated with autism and autistic traits that increase risk of suicidality. Camouflaging and unmet support needs appear to be risk markers for suicidality unique to ASC. Non-suicidal self-injury, employment, and mental health problems appear to be risk markers shared with the general population that are significantly more prevalent in the autistic community. Implications for understanding and prevention of suicide in ASC are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 606 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 274 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 274 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 15%
Student > Bachelor 35 13%
Researcher 30 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 29 11%
Other 42 15%
Unknown 58 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 114 42%
Social Sciences 26 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 3%
Arts and Humanities 5 2%
Other 26 9%
Unknown 75 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 550. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2021.
All research outputs
#26,462
of 19,151,080 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#3
of 614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#754
of 290,401 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,151,080 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,401 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them