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Experiences of HIV-positive postpartum women and health workers involved with community-based antiretroviral therapy adherence clubs in Cape Town, South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
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Title
Experiences of HIV-positive postpartum women and health workers involved with community-based antiretroviral therapy adherence clubs in Cape Town, South Africa
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5836-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zara Trafford, Yolanda Gomba, Christopher J. Colvin, Victoria O. Iyun, Tamsin K. Phillips, Kirsty Brittain, Landon Myer, Elaine J. Abrams, Allison Zerbe

Abstract

The rollout of universal, lifelong treatment for all HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women ("Option B+") has rapidly increased the number of women initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) and requiring ART care postpartum. In a pilot project in South Africa, eligible postpartum women were offered the choice of referral to the standard of care, a local primary health care clinic, or a community-based model of differentiated ART services, the adherence club (AC). ACs have typically enrolled only non-pregnant and non-postpartum adults; postpartum women had not previously been referred directly from antenatal care. There is little evidence regarding postpartum women's preferences for and experiences of differentiated models of care, or the capacity of this particular model to cater to their specific needs. This qualitative paper reports on feedback from both postpartum women and health workers who care for them on their respective experiences of the AC. One-on-one in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 (23%) of the 84 postpartum women who selected the AC and were retained at approximately 12 months postpartum, and 9 health workers who staff the AC. Data were transcribed and thematically analysed using NVivo 11. Postpartum women's inclusion in the AC was acceptable for both participants and health workers. Health workers were welcoming of postpartum women but expressed concerns about prospects for longer term adherence and retention, and raised logistical issues they felt might compromise trust with AC members in general. Enrolling postpartum women in mixed groups with the general adult population is feasible and acceptable. Preliminary recommendations are offered and may assist in supporting the specific needs of postpartum women transitioning from antenatal ART care. Number NCT02417675 clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT02417675 (retrospective reg.).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 19%
Researcher 14 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 28 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 23 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 20%
Social Sciences 7 7%
Psychology 5 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 3%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 36 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2019.
All research outputs
#1,888,103
of 15,814,158 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,250
of 10,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,093
of 279,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,814,158 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,885 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,196 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.