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Effect and cost of an after-school dance programme on the physical activity of 11–12 year old girls: The Bristol Girls Dance Project, a school-based cluster randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
19 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
150 Mendeley
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Title
Effect and cost of an after-school dance programme on the physical activity of 11–12 year old girls: The Bristol Girls Dance Project, a school-based cluster randomised controlled trial
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0289-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Russell Jago, Mark J Edwards, Simon J Sebire, Keeley Tomkinson, Emma L Bird, Kathryn Banfield, Thomas May, Joanna M Kesten, Ashley R Cooper, Jane E Powell, Peter S Blair, Mark J. Edwards, Simon J. Sebire, Emma L. Bird, Joanna M. Kesten, Ashley R. Cooper, Jane E. Powell, Peter S. Blair

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness and cost of an after-school dance intervention at increasing the physical activity levels of Year 7 girls (age 11-12). A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in 18 secondary schools. Participants were Year 7 girls attending a study school. The Bristol Girls Dance Project (BGDP) intervention consisted of up to forty, 75-minute dance sessions delivered in the period immediately after school by experienced dance instructors over 20-weeks. The pre-specified primary outcome was accelerometer assessed mean minutes of weekday moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at time 2 (52 weeks are T0 baseline assessments). Secondary outcomes included accelerometer assessed mean minutes of weekday MVPA at time 1 (while the intervention was still running) and psychosocial outcomes. Intervention costs were assessed. 571 girls participated. Valid accelerometer data were collected from 549 girls at baseline with 508 girls providing valid accelerometer data at baseline and time 2. There were no differences between the intervention and control group for accelerometer assessed physical activity at either time 1 or time 2. Only one third of the girls in the intervention arm met the pre-set adherence criteria of attending two thirds of the dance sessions that were available to them. Instrumental variable regression analyses using complier average causal effects provided no evidence of a difference between girls who attended the sessions and the control group. The average cost of the intervention was £73 per girl, which was reduced to £63 when dance instructor travel expenses were excluded. This trial showed no evidence that an after-school dance programme can increase the physical activity of Year 7 girls. The trial highlighted the difficulty encountered in maintaining attendance in physical activity programmes delivered in secondary schools. There is a need to find new ways to help adolescent girls to be physically active via identifying ways to support and encourage sustained engagement in physical activity over the life course. ISRCTN52882523.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 148 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 19%
Student > Master 25 17%
Researcher 21 14%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Student > Postgraduate 7 5%
Other 29 19%
Unknown 25 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 25 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 15%
Social Sciences 19 13%
Psychology 17 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 10%
Other 20 13%
Unknown 32 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,093,008
of 15,917,403 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#489
of 1,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,833
of 254,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#4
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,917,403 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,564 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.