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Use of and short-term impacts of new cycling infrastructure in inner-Sydney, Australia: a quasi-experimental design

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
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Title
Use of and short-term impacts of new cycling infrastructure in inner-Sydney, Australia: a quasi-experimental design
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0294-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris Rissel, Stephen Greaves, Li Ming Wen, Melanie Crane, Chris Standen

Abstract

Given increasing investment in new cycling infrastructure, it is important to understand its impacts. The Sydney Transport and Health Study evaluates a new 2.4 km bi-directional separated bicycle path in inner-Sydney. This paper describes the users of the new bicycle path, and examines its short-term impacts upon cycling behaviour and perceptions of the local environment. Data were collected from two bike counts at two intersections on the new bicycle path in the intervention area in 2013 and 2014. On-line surveys collected individual participant data in the intervention area and a similar comparison area before the bicycle path was built (2013), and 12 months later (four months after completion) (n = 512). The data included self-reported cycling behaviour, use of the new bicycle path and perceptions of changes in the local environment. Bike counts at two sites on the new bicycle path reported an increase of 23 % and 97 % respectively at 12 months. However, among the participants in the cohort, there was no change in the self-reported weekly frequency of cycling. One in six (approximately 15 %) participants reported using the new bicycle path, with most users (76 %) living in the intervention area. Bicycle path users were most likely to be frequent riders (at least weekly) [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 7.50, 95 % CI 3.93-14.31], be a high intensity recreational rider (AOR = 4.38, 95 % CI 1.53-12.54) or a low intensity transport rider (AOR = 2.42, 95 % CI 1.17-5.04) and live closer to the bicycle path (AOR = 1.24, 1.13-1.37). Perceptions that the neighbourhood was more pleasant, that there were more people walking and cycling were significantly higher in the intervention area at 12 months (both P values <0.05). Existing cycling behaviour and proximity to the bicycle path were associated with the use of the new bicycle path. Increased use of the new bicycle path as reported by the participants in the intervention area and increased cycling recorded by the bike counts may be due to existing cyclists changing routes to use the new path, and more cyclists from outside the study area using the new path, as study participants did not increase their frequency of cycling. Increases in cycling frequency in the intervention neighbourhood may require a longer lead time, additional promotional activities and further maturation of the Sydney bicycle path network. Understanding how new cycling infrastructure impacts communities can influence the promotion of such infrastructure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 103 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 19%
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Other 8 8%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 18 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 18 17%
Engineering 13 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 12%
Sports and Recreations 6 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 5%
Other 25 24%
Unknown 25 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2019.
All research outputs
#545,736
of 16,209,978 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#211
of 1,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,874
of 254,782 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,209,978 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,584 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,782 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.