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Rapidly declining skeletal muscle mass predicts poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma treated with transcatheter intra-arterial therapies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, July 2018
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2 tweeters

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Rapidly declining skeletal muscle mass predicts poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma treated with transcatheter intra-arterial therapies
Published in
BMC Cancer, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12885-018-4673-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takamasa Kobayashi, Hirokazu Kawai, Oki Nakano, Satoshi Abe, Hiroteru Kamimura, Akira Sakamaki, Kenya Kamimura, Atsunori Tsuchiya, Masaaki Takamura, Satoshi Yamagiwa, Shuji Terai

Abstract

The impact of sarcopenia on the prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who receive transcatheter intra-arterial therapies, including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization and transcatheter arterial infusion chemotherapy, remains unclear. We investigated the prognostic value of skeletal muscle loss (SML) stratified by cutoffs for sarcopenia and rate of change in skeletal muscle mass over 6 months. We retrospectively evaluated 102 patients with HCC treated with transcatheter intra-arterial therapies between 2005 and 2015. Computed tomography images of the third lumbar vertebra (L3) were analyzed to obtain the skeletal muscle area normalized for the height squared, defined as the skeletal muscle index at L3 (L3 SMI), before and 6 months after treatment. Low or high SMI was defined using cutoff values of 42 cm2/m2 in men and 38 cm2/m2 in women. The rate of change in skeletal muscle mass (ΔL3 SMI) over 6 months was calculated. Overall survival (OS) was compared in groups classified by baseline L3 SMI and ΔL3 SMI; prognostic significance was assessed with univariate and multivariate analyses, using Cox proportional hazards models. OS did not differ significantly between groups with low (n = 31) and high (n = 71) SMI at baseline (P = 0.172), but OS was significantly poorer in patients with SML (n = 41), defined as ΔL3 SMI < - 4.6% over 6 months than in those without SML (n = 61, P = 0.018). On multivariate analysis, SML (hazard ratio [HR], 1.675; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.031-2.721; P = 0.037), serum alpha-fetoprotein ≥20 ng/mL (HR, 2.550; 95% CI, 1.440-4.515; P = 0.001), and maximum tumor diameter ≥ 30 mm (HR, 1.925; 95% CI, 1.166-3.179; P = 0.010) were independent predictors of poor OS. Baseline L3 SMI was not significantly associated with OS (HR, 1.405; 95% CI, 0.861-2.293; P = 0.174). ΔL3 SMI was an independent prognostic factor in patients with HCC treated with transcatheter intra-arterial therapies. Further study is required to reveal whether prevention of skeletal muscle depletion might be a new therapeutic strategy to contribute to improved clinical outcomes in patients with HCC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Student > Master 6 11%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 15 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 21 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,351,582
of 13,325,587 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,431
of 4,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,520
of 268,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,325,587 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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