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Caspases and matrix metalloproteases facilitate collective behavior of non-neural ectoderm after hindbrain neuropore closure

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Developmental Biology, July 2018
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Title
Caspases and matrix metalloproteases facilitate collective behavior of non-neural ectoderm after hindbrain neuropore closure
Published in
BMC Developmental Biology, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12861-018-0175-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Naomi Shinotsuka, Yoshifumi Yamaguchi, Kenichi Nakazato, Yudai Matsumoto, Atsushi Mochizuki, Masayuki Miura

Abstract

Mammalian brain is formed through neural tube closure (NTC), wherein both ridges of opposing neural folds are fused in the midline and remodeled in the roof plate of the neural tube and overlying non-neural ectodermal layer. Apoptosis is widely observed from the beginning of NTC at the neural ridges and is crucial for the proper progression of NTC, but its role after the closure remains less clear. Here, we conducted live-imaging analysis of the mid-hindbrain neuropore (MHNP) closure and revealed unexpected collective behavior of cells surrounding the MHNP. The cells first gathered to the closing point and subsequently relocated as if they were released from the point. Inhibition of caspases or matrix metalloproteases with chemical inhibitors impaired the cell relocation. These lines of evidence suggest that apoptosis-mediated degradation of extracellular matrix might facilitate the final process of neuropore closure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Unknown 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 57%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 14%
Engineering 1 14%
Unknown 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2019.
All research outputs
#11,343,473
of 14,308,102 outputs
Outputs from BMC Developmental Biology
#254
of 312 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#204,808
of 275,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Developmental Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,308,102 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 312 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them