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A potential role for interleukin-33 and γ-epithelium sodium channel in the pathogenesis of human malaria associated lung injury

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, October 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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33 Mendeley
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Title
A potential role for interleukin-33 and γ-epithelium sodium channel in the pathogenesis of human malaria associated lung injury
Published in
Malaria Journal, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0922-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sumate Ampawong, Urai Chaisri, Parnpen Viriyavejakul, Panote Prapansilp, Georges E. Grau, Gareth D. H. Turner, Emsri Pongponratn

Abstract

The pathogenesis of pulmonary oedema (PE) in patients with severe malaria is still unclear. It has been hypothesized that lung injury depends, in addition to microvascular obstruction, on an increased pulmonary capillary pressure and altered alveolar-capillary membrane permeability, causing pulmonary fluid accumulation. This study compared the histopathological features of lung injury in Southeast Asian patients (n = 43) who died from severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and correlated these with clinical history in groups with or without PE. To investigate the expression of mediators that may influence fluid accumulation in PE, immunohistochemistry and image analysis were performed on controls and sub-sets of patient with or without PE. The expression of leukocyte sub-set antigens, bronchial interleukin (IL)-33, γ-epithelium sodium channel (ENaC), aquaporin (AQP)-1 and -5, and control cytokeratin staining was quantified in the lung tissue of severe malaria patients. Bronchial IL-33 expression was significantly increased in severe malaria patients with PE. Malaria patients with shock showed significantly increased bronchial IL-33 compare to other clinical manifestations. Bronchial IL-33 levels were positively correlated with CD68+ monocyte and elastase + neutrophil, septal congestion and hyaline membrane formation. Moreover, the expression of both vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and bronchial γ-ENaC significantly decreased in severe malaria patients with PE. Both VSMC and bronchial γ-ENaC were negatively correlated with the degree of parasitized erythrocyte sequestration, alveolar thickness, alveolar expansion score, septal congestion score, and malarial pigment score. In contrast AQP-1 and -5 and pan cytokeratin levels were similar between groups. The results suggest that IL-33 may play a role in lung injury during severe malaria and lead to PE. Both VSMC and bronchial γ-ENaC downregulation may explain pulmonary fluid disturbances and participate in PE pathogenesis in severe malaria patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Postgraduate 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Lecturer 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 9 27%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Computer Science 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 7 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2015.
All research outputs
#4,645,372
of 6,606,474 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,737
of 2,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,184
of 207,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#111
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,606,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,307 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 207,662 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.