↓ Skip to main content

High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy decreases postextubation neuroventilatory drive and work of breathing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, August 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
138 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
95 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy decreases postextubation neuroventilatory drive and work of breathing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Published in
Critical Care, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13054-018-2107-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosa Di mussi, Savino Spadaro, Tania Stripoli, Carlo Alberto Volta, Paolo Trerotoli, Paola Pierucci, Francesco Staffieri, Francesco Bruno, Luigi Camporota, Salvatore Grasso

Abstract

The physiological effects of high-flow nasal cannula O2 therapy (HFNC) have been evaluated mainly in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure. In this study, we compared the effects of HFNC and conventional low-flow O2 therapy on the neuroventilatory drive and work of breathing postextubation in patients with a background of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who had received mechanical ventilation for hypercapnic respiratory failure. This was a single center, unblinded, cross-over study on 14 postextubation COPD patients who were recovering from an episode of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure of various etiologies. After extubation, each patient received two 1-h periods of HFNC (HFNC1 and HFNC2) alternated with 1 h of conventional low-flow O2 therapy via a face mask. The inspiratory fraction of oxygen was titrated to achieve an arterial O2 saturation target of 88-92%. Gas exchange, breathing pattern, neuroventilatory drive (electrical diaphragmatic activity (EAdi)) and work of breathing (inspiratory trans-diaphragmatic pressure-time product per minute (PTPDI/min)) were recorded. EAdi peak increased from a mean (±SD) of 15.4 ± 6.4 to 23.6 ± 10.5 μV switching from HFNC1 to conventional O2, and then returned to 15.2 ± 6.4 μV during HFNC2 (conventional O2: p < 0.05 versus HFNC1 and HFNC2). Similarly, the PTPDI/min increased from 135 ± 60 to 211 ± 70 cmH2O/s/min, and then decreased again during HFNC2 to 132 ± 56 (conventional O2: p < 0.05 versus HFNC1 and HFNC2). In patients with COPD, the application of HFNC postextubation significantly decreased the neuroventilatory drive and work of breathing compared with conventional O2 therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 138 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 95 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 17 18%
Student > Postgraduate 12 13%
Researcher 9 9%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 20 21%
Unknown 23 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 52 55%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Sports and Recreations 2 2%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 23 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 91. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2019.
All research outputs
#309,033
of 19,194,973 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#195
of 5,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,570
of 291,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,194,973 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,564 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,929 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them