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Integration of molecular cytogenetics, dated molecular phylogeny, and model-based predictions to understand the extreme chromosome reorganization in the Neotropical genus Tonatia (Chiroptera…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

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10 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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47 Mendeley
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3 CiteULike
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Title
Integration of molecular cytogenetics, dated molecular phylogeny, and model-based predictions to understand the extreme chromosome reorganization in the Neotropical genus Tonatia (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0494-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cibele G. Sotero-Caio, Marianne Volleth, Federico G. Hoffmann, LuAnn Scott, Holly A. Wichman, Fengtang Yang, Robert J. Baker

Abstract

Defining factors that contributed to the fixation of a high number of underdominant chromosomal rearrangements is a complex task because not only molecular mechanisms must be considered, but also the uniqueness of natural history attributes of each taxon. Ideally, detailed investigation of the chromosome architecture of an organism and related groups, placed within a phylogenetic context, is required. We used multiple approaches to investigate the dynamics of chromosomal evolution in lineages of bats with considerable karyotypic variation, focusing on the different facets contributing to fixation of the exceptional chromosomal changes in Tonatia saurophila. Integration of empirical data with proposed models of chromosome evolution was performed to understand the probable conditions for Tonatia's karyotypic evolution. The trajectory of reorganization of chromosome blocks since the common ancestor of Glossophaginae and Phyllostominae subfamilies suggests that multiple tandem fusions, as well as disruption and fusions of conserved phyllostomid chromosomes were major drivers of karyotypic reshuffling in Tonatia. Considerable variation in the rates of chromosomal evolution between phyllostomid lineages was observed. Thirty-nine unique fusions and fission events reached fixation in Tonatia over a short period of time, followed by ~12 million years of chromosomal stasis. Physical mapping of repetitive DNA revealed an unusual accumulation of LINE-1 sequences on centromeric regions, probably associated with the chromosomal dynamics of this genus. Multiple rearrangements have reached fixation in a wave-like fashion in phyllostomid bats. Different biological features of Tonatia support distinct models of rearrangement fixation, and it is unlikely that the fixations were a result of solely stochastic processes in small ancient populations. Increased recombination rates were probably facilitated by expansion of repetitive DNA, reinforced by aspects of taxon reproduction and ecology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 26%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 11%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 62%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2016.
All research outputs
#4,211,486
of 16,519,195 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,100
of 2,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,076
of 255,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,519,195 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,773 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,393 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them