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Betaine reduces β-amyloid-induced paralysis through activation of cystathionine-β-synthase in an Alzheimer model of Caenorhabditis elegans

Overview of attention for article published in Genes & Nutrition, July 2018
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2 tweeters

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Title
Betaine reduces β-amyloid-induced paralysis through activation of cystathionine-β-synthase in an Alzheimer model of Caenorhabditis elegans
Published in
Genes & Nutrition, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12263-018-0611-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Leiteritz, Benjamin Dilberger, Uwe Wenzel, Elena Fitzenberger

Abstract

The neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease is caused by the accumulation of toxic aggregates of β-amyloid in the human brain. On the one hand, hyperhomocysteinemia has been shown to be a risk factor for cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, betaine has been demonstrated to attenuate Alzheimer-like pathological changes induced by homocysteine. It is reasonable to conclude that this is due to triggering the remethylation pathway mediated by betaine-homocysteine-methyltransferase. In the present study, we used the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain CL2006, to test whether betaine is able to reduce β-amyloid-induced paralysis in C. elegans. This model expresses human β-amyloid 1-42 under control of a muscle-specific promoter that leads to progressive, age-dependent paralysis in the nematodes. Betaine at a concentration of 100 μM was able to reduce homocysteine levels in the presence and absence of 1 mM homocysteine. Simultaneously, betaine both reduced normal paralysis rates in the absence of homocysteine and increased paralysis rates triggered by addition of homocysteine. Knockdown of cystathionine-β-synthase using RNA interference both increased homocysteine levels and paralysis. Additionally, it prevented the reducing effects of betaine on homocysteine levels and paralysis. Our studies show that betaine is able to reduce homocysteine levels and β-amyloid-induced toxicity in a C. elegans model for Alzheimer's disease. This effect is independent of the remethylation pathway but requires the transsulfuration pathway mediated by cystathionine-β-synthase.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 25%
Student > Master 6 25%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Professor 2 8%
Researcher 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 5 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,510,200
of 13,804,624 outputs
Outputs from Genes & Nutrition
#240
of 333 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,444
of 272,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genes & Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,804,624 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 333 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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