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A telephone survey of factors affecting willingness to participate in health research surveys

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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75 Dimensions

Readers on

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75 Mendeley
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Title
A telephone survey of factors affecting willingness to participate in health research surveys
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2350-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

DC Glass, HL Kelsall, C. Slegers, AB Forbes, B. Loff, D. Zion, L. Fritschi

Abstract

In recent years, reduced participation has been encountered across all epidemiological study designs, both in terms of non-response as well as refusal. A low response rate may reduce the statistical power but, more importantly, results may not be generalizable to the wider community. In a telephone survey of 1413 randomly selected members of the Australian general population and of 690 participants sourced from previous studies, we examined factors affecting people's stated willingness to participate in health research. The majority of participants (61 %) expressed willingness to participate in health research in general but the percentage increased when provided with more specific information about the research. People were more willing if they have personal experience of the disease under study, and if the study was funded by government or charity rather than pharmaceutical companies. Participants from previous studies, older people and women were the groups most willing to participate. Younger men preferred online surveys, older people a written questionnaire, and few participants in any age and sex groups preferred a telephone questionnaire. Despite a trend toward reduced participation rates, most participants expressed their willingness to participate in health research. However, when seeking participants, researchers should be concrete and specific about the nature of the research they want to carry out. The preferred method of recommended contact varies with the demographic characteristics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 74 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 17%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 18 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 12%
Psychology 6 8%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 5%
Other 16 21%
Unknown 25 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2021.
All research outputs
#7,223,325
of 22,829,683 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,601
of 14,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,370
of 277,499 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#139
of 267 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,829,683 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,871 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,499 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 267 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.