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Transcriptomic analyses of regenerating adult feathers in chicken

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, October 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

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Title
Transcriptomic analyses of regenerating adult feathers in chicken
Published in
BMC Genomics, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1966-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chen Siang Ng, Chih-Kuan Chen, Wen-Lang Fan, Ping Wu, Siao-Man Wu, Jiun-Jie Chen, Yu-Ting Lai, Chi-Tang Mao, Mei-Yeh Jade Lu, Di-Rong Chen, Ze-Shiang Lin, Kai-Jung Yang, Yuan-An Sha, Tsung-Che Tu, Chih-Feng Chen, Cheng-Ming Chuong, Wen-Hsiung Li

Abstract

Feathers have diverse forms with hierarchical branching patterns and are an excellent model for studying the development and evolution of morphological traits. The complex structure of feathers allows for various types of morphological changes to occur. The genetic basis of the structural differences between different parts of a feather and between different types of feather is a fundamental question in the study of feather diversity, yet there is only limited relevant information for gene expression during feather development. We conducted transcriptomic analysis of five zones of feather morphologies from two feather types at different times during their regeneration after plucking. The expression profiles of genes associated with the development of feather structure were examined. We compared the gene expression patterns in different types of feathers and different portions of a feather and identified morphotype-specific gene expression patterns. Many candidate genes were identified for growth control, morphogenesis, or the differentiation of specific structures of different feather types. This study laid the ground work for studying the evolutionary origin and diversification of feathers as abundant data were produced for the study of feather morphogenesis. It significantly increased our understanding of the complex molecular and cellular events in feather development processes and provided a foundation for future studies on the development of other skin appendages.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Korea, Republic of 1 3%
France 1 3%
Japan 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 32 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 34%
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 24%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2016.
All research outputs
#5,734,404
of 7,936,934 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,186
of 5,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,451
of 240,580 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#301
of 359 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,936,934 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,683 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,580 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 359 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.