↓ Skip to main content

How low should we target the LDL goal to improve survival for acute coronary syndrome patients in Hong Kong?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
How low should we target the LDL goal to improve survival for acute coronary syndrome patients in Hong Kong?
Published in
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12872-015-0117-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vivian W. Lee, Raymond Y. Chau, Herich Y. Cheung, Cheuk Man Yu, Yat Yin Lam, Bryan P. Yan

Abstract

Utilization of lipid-lowering agents has been associated with improved long-term outcomes in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. However, updated data regarding local use and outcomes was lacking. We retrospectively reviewed 696 hospitalized patients in the local ACS registry of Prince of Wales Hospital during 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009 with data retrieved using computerized clinical records of all patients. Among the 402 MI patients included, 104 (25.9 %) were not prescribed with statins at discharge. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) not performed or planned during hospitalization (OR: 0.324, p = 0.001) and latest lower LDL-C level before discharge (OR: 0.221 for an increment of 1 mmol/L, p = 0.009) were significant independent predictors of the absence of statin prescriptions at discharge. A significantly lower all-cause mortality rate (14.4 % vs 51.7 %, p < 0.001), fewer total hospitalizations (p < 0.001) and fewer hospitalizations due to cardiovascular problems (p < 0.001) were observed in patients discharged with statins. LDL-C goal attainment of < 2.6 mmol/L resulted in a significant reduction in mortality (10.8 % vs 24.2 %, p = 0.001), but not for goal attainment of < 1.8 mmol/L. Significant difference in survival existed only when LDL-C cut-off values were above 2.4 mmol/L. This study revealed the under-utilization of statin therapy in eligible MI patients at discharge and unsatisfactory percentages of LDL-C goal attainment, and also reassured the role of low LDL-C reduction to < 2.6 mmol/L in the management of MI. However, the current study did not show that the lower LDL-C reduction improved survival of ACS patients. Further research should be conducted to assess the necessity of aggressive LDL-C reduction to < 1.8 mmol/L in local patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 7%
Ireland 1 7%
Unknown 12 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Researcher 2 14%
Other 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 50%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Unknown 6 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2015.
All research outputs
#5,304,782
of 6,242,237 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#453
of 508 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,379
of 193,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#23
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,242,237 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 508 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,650 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.