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Is dying in hospital better than home in incurable cancer and what factors influence this? A population-based study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
71 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
90 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
234 Mendeley
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Title
Is dying in hospital better than home in incurable cancer and what factors influence this? A population-based study
Published in
BMC Medicine, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0466-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Barbara Gomes, Natalia Calanzani, Jonathan Koffman, Irene J. Higginson

Abstract

Studies show that most patients with advanced cancer prefer to die at home. However, not all have equal chances and the evidence is unclear on whether dying at home is better. This study aims to determine the association between place of death, health services used, and pain, feeling at peace, and grief intensity. Mortality follow-back study of 352 cancer patients who died in hospital (n = 177) or at home (n = 175) in London, UK. Bereaved relatives identified from death registrations completed a questionnaire including validated measures of patient's pain and peace in the last week of life and their own grief intensity. We determined factors influencing death at home, and associations between place of death and pain, peace, and grief. Where people died was, for most (80 %), the place where they lived during their last week of life. Four factors explained >91 % of home deaths: patient's preference, relative's preference, home palliative care, or district/community nursing. The propensity of death at home also increased when the relative was aware of incurability and the patient discussed his/her preferences with family. Dying in hospital was associated with more hospital days, fewer general practitioner (GP) home visits, and fewer days taken off work by relatives. Adjusting for confounders, patients who died at home experienced similar pain levels but more peace in their last week of life (ordered log odds ratio 0.69, P = 0.007). Grief was less intense for their relatives than for those of patients who died in hospital (β, -0.15 around time of death and -0.14 at questionnaire completion, P = 0.02). The study suggests that dying at home is better than hospital for peace and grief, but requires a discussion of preferences, GP home visits, and relatives to be given time off work. National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network Portfolio. UKCRN7041 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 71 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 234 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 228 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 48 21%
Student > Bachelor 32 14%
Researcher 26 11%
Other 17 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 7%
Other 55 24%
Unknown 39 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 91 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 63 27%
Social Sciences 13 6%
Psychology 4 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 54 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 185. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2018.
All research outputs
#130,150
of 18,949,038 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#117
of 2,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,215
of 262,658 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,949,038 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,841 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,658 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them