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Where backyard poultry raisers seek care for sick poultry: implications for avian influenza prevention in Bangladesh

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2018
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Where backyard poultry raisers seek care for sick poultry: implications for avian influenza prevention in Bangladesh
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5819-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadia Ali Rimi, Rebeca Sultana, Kazi Ishtiak-Ahmed, Najmul Haider, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, Nazmun Nahar, Stephen P. Luby

Abstract

In Bangladesh, backyard poultry raisers lack awareness of avian influenza and infrequently follow government recommendations for its prevention. Identifying where poultry raisers seek care for their ill poultry might help the government better plan how to disseminate avian influenza prevention and control recommendations. In order to identify where backyard poultry raisers seek care for their ill poultry, we conducted in-depth and informal interviews: 70 with backyard poultry raisers and six with local poultry healthcare providers in two villages, and five with government veterinary professionals at the sub-district and union levels in two districts during June-August 2009. Most (86% [60/70]) raisers sought care for their backyard poultry locally, 14% used home remedies only and none sought care from government veterinary professionals. The local poultry care providers provided advice and medications (n = 6). Four local care providers had shops in the village market where raisers sought healthcare for their poultry and the remaining two visited rural households to provide poultry healthcare services. Five of the six local care providers did not have formal training in veterinary medicine. Local care providers either did not know about avian influenza or considered avian influenza to be a disease common among commercial but not backyard poultry. The government professionals had degrees in veterinary medicine and experience with avian influenza and its prevention. They had their offices at the sub-district or union level and lacked staffing to reach the backyard raisers at the village level. The local poultry care providers provided front line healthcare to backyard poultry in villages and were a potential source of information for the rural raisers. Integration of these local poultry care providers in the government's avian influenza control programs is a potentially useful approach to increase poultry raisers' and local poultry care providers' awareness about avian influenza.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Unspecified 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 9 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Unspecified 2 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 15 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,849,194
of 14,123,042 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,291
of 9,722 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,406
of 274,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,123,042 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,722 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,850 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.