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Attitudes and use of medicinal plants during pregnancy among women at health care centers in three regions of Mali, West-Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, October 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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40 Dimensions

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179 Mendeley
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Title
Attitudes and use of medicinal plants during pregnancy among women at health care centers in three regions of Mali, West-Africa
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0057-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cecilie Sogn Nergard, Thi Phung Than Ho, Drissa Diallo, Ngolo Ballo, Berit Smestad Paulsen, Hedvig Nordeng

Abstract

Although, medicinal plants have been important for women's health historically, the knowledge about such use during pregnancy in developing countries is limited. This is the first quantitative, ethnobotanical study on Malian women's use of and attitudes towards the use of medicinal plants during pregnancy. The aim of the study was to describe Malian women's use of medicinal plants during pregnancy according to indications and to evaluate the potentially safety of such use. The overall aim was to preserve valuable information about medicinal plants for women's reproductive health for the future. Data was collected through structured interviews of 209 pregnant women or mothers in three health care centers in Mali. The women were interviewed about their uses of medicinal plants during pregnancy and their attitudes to such use. Nine specific medicinal plants commonly used in Mali and treatment of eleven common ailments in pregnancy were specifically queried about. In total, 79.9 % had used medicinal plants during pregnancy. Only 17 women (8.5 %) had received a recommendation from a traditional practitioner (TP). The most commonly used medicinal plants were Lippia chevalieri (55.5 %), Combretum micranthum (39.7 %), Parkia biglobosa (12.0 %) and Vepris heterophylla (8.1 %). The most common reasons for use were for well-being (37.7 %), symptoms of malaria (37.1 %) and "increased salt-elimination" (to reduce edema) (19.2 %). For treatment of symptoms of malaria and urinary tract infections during pregnancy, the women's choices of medicinal plants agreed with those previously reported from interviews with TPs. Almost 30 % believed that medicinal plants had no adverse effects for the mother. This study showed an extensive use and knowledge of medicinal plants during pregnancy in three regions in Mali. However, exclusive use of medicinal plants as treatment of malaria and urinary tract infections during pregnancy may pose a health risk for the mother and her unborn child. A wider collaboration with TPs, with local communities and conventional health workers of the health care centers, on the safe use of medicinal plants, is important to promote safer pregnancies and better health care for pregnant women and their unborn infants in Mali.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 179 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Malawi 1 <1%
Unknown 177 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 18%
Student > Bachelor 31 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 11%
Lecturer 14 8%
Student > Postgraduate 12 7%
Other 31 17%
Unknown 40 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 25 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 7%
Social Sciences 12 7%
Other 34 19%
Unknown 46 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2015.
All research outputs
#11,979,473
of 18,883,809 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#497
of 694 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,704
of 262,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,883,809 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 694 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,524 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.