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DNA methylation and the epigenetic clock in relation to physical frailty in older people: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, August 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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58 Mendeley
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Title
DNA methylation and the epigenetic clock in relation to physical frailty in older people: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13148-018-0538-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catharine R. Gale, Riccardo E. Marioni, Sarah E. Harris, John M. Starr, Ian J. Deary

Abstract

The biological mechanisms underlying frailty in older people are poorly understood. There is some evidence to suggest that DNA methylation patterns may be altered in frail individuals. Participants were 791 people aged 70 years from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936. DNA methylation was measured in whole blood. Biological age was estimated using two measures of DNA methylation-based age acceleration-extrinsic and intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration. We carried out an epigenome-wide association study of physical frailty, as defined by the Fried phenotype. Multinomial logistic regression was used to calculate relative risk ratios for being physically frail or pre-frail according to epigenetic age acceleration. There was a single significant (P = 1.16 × 10-7) association in the epigenome-wide association study comparing frail versus not frail. The same CpG was not significant when comparing pre-frail versus not frail. Greater extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration was associated with an increased risk of being physically frail, but not of being pre-frail. For a year increase in extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration, age- and sex-adjusted relative risk ratios (95% CI) for being physically frail or pre-frail were 1.06 (1.02, 1.10) and 1.02 (1.00, 1.04), respectively. After further adjustment for smoking and chronic disease, the association with physical frailty remained significant. Intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration was not associated with physical frailty status. People who are biologically older, as indexed by greater extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration, are more likely to be physically frail. Future research will need to investigate whether epigenetic age acceleration plays a causal role in the onset of physical frailty.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Master 4 7%
Other 14 24%
Unknown 6 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 16 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 August 2021.
All research outputs
#5,901,382
of 18,815,546 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#424
of 1,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,211
of 290,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,815,546 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,025 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,318 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them