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The Hox cluster microRNA miR-615: a case study of intronic microRNA evolution

Overview of attention for article published in EvoDevo, October 2015
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Title
The Hox cluster microRNA miR-615: a case study of intronic microRNA evolution
Published in
EvoDevo, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13227-015-0027-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shan Quah, Peter W. H. Holland

Abstract

Introns represent a potentially rich source of existing transcription for the evolution of novel microRNAs (miRNAs). Within the Hox gene clusters, a miRNA gene, miR-615, is located within the intron of the Hoxc5 gene. This miRNA has a restricted phylogenetic distribution, providing an opportunity to examine the origin and evolution of a new miRNA within the intron of a developmentally-important homeobox gene. Alignment and structural analyses show that the sequence is highly conserved across eutherian mammals and absent in non-mammalian tetrapods. Marsupials possess a similar sequence which we predict will not be efficiently processed as a miRNA. Our analyses suggest that transcription of HOXC5 in humans is accompanied by expression of miR-615 in all cases, but that the miRNA can also be transcribed independently of its host gene through the use of an intragenic promoter. We present scenarios for the evolution of miR-615 through intronic exaptation, and speculate on the acquisition of independent transcriptional regulation. Target prediction and transcriptomic analyses suggest that the dominant product of miR-615 is involved in the regulation of growth and a range of developmental processes. The miR-615 gene evolved within the intron of Hoxc5 in the ancestor of placental mammals. Using miR-615 as a case study, we propose a model by which a functional miRNA can emerge within an intron gradually, by selection on secondary structure followed by evolution of an independent miRNA promoter. The location within a Hox gene intron is of particular interest as the miRNA is specific to placental mammals, is co-expressed with its host gene and may share complementary functions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 30%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Professor 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Computer Science 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2015.
All research outputs
#5,303,284
of 6,240,950 outputs
Outputs from EvoDevo
#156
of 166 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,866
of 193,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EvoDevo
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,240,950 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 166 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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