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Comparison of characteristics and mortality in multidrug resistant (MDR) and non-MDR tuberculosis patients in China

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2015
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

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80 Mendeley
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Title
Comparison of characteristics and mortality in multidrug resistant (MDR) and non-MDR tuberculosis patients in China
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2327-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yanni Sun, David Harley, Hassan Vally, Adrian Sleigh

Abstract

We conducted a cohort study to compare the characteristics of MDR-TB with non-MDR-TB patients and to measure long term (9-year) mortality rate and determine factors associated with death in China. We reviewed the medical records of 250 TB cases from a 2001 survey to compare 100 MDR-TB patients with 150 non-MDR-TB patients who were treated in 2001-2002. Baseline attributes extracted from the records were compared between the two cohorts and long-term mortality and risk factors were determined at nine-year follow-up in 2010. Among the 234 patients successfully followed up, 63 (26.9%) were female and 171 (73.1 %) were male. MDR-TB patients had poorer socioeconomic status compared to non-MDRTB. Nine years after the diagnosis of TB, 69 or 29.5 % of the 234 patients had died (32 or 21.6 % of non-MDR-TB versus 37 or 43.0 % of MDR-TB) and the overall mortality rate was 39/1000 per year (PY) (27/1000 PY among non-MDR versus 63/1000 PY among MDR-TB). Factors associated with death included: MDR status (hazard ratio (HR): 1.86; CI: 1.09-3.13), limited education of primary school or lower (HR: 2.51; CI 1.34-4.70) and received TB treatment during the nine-year period (HR 1.82; 95 % CI 1.02-3.26). MDR-TB was a strong predictor for poor long-term outcome. High quality diagnosis and treatment must be ensured. Greater reimbursement or free treatment may be needed to provide access for the poor and vulnerable populations, and to increase treatment compliance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 78 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 28%
Student > Bachelor 13 16%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 11 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 12 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,382,424
of 6,230,693 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,956
of 6,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,012
of 193,770 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#207
of 266 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,230,693 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,107 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,770 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 266 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.