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Caffeine differentially alters cortical hemodynamic activity during working memory: a near infrared spectroscopy study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, October 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Caffeine differentially alters cortical hemodynamic activity during working memory: a near infrared spectroscopy study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1491-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Urs Heilbronner, Hermann Hinrichs, Hans-Jochen Heinze, Tino Zaehle

Abstract

Caffeine is a widely used stimulant with potentially beneficial effects on cognition as well as vasoconstrictive properties. In functional magnetic imaging research, caffeine has gained attention as a potential enhancer of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response. In order to clarify changes of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin (HbO and HbR) induced by caffeine during a cognitive task, we investigated a working memory (WM) paradigm (visual 2-back) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Behaviorally, caffeine had no effect on the WM performance but influenced reaction times in the 0-back condition. NIRS data demonstrate caffeine-dependent alterations of the course of the hemodynamic response. The intake of 200 mg caffeine caused a significant decrease of the HbO response between 20 and 40 s after the onset of a 2-back task in the bilateral inferior frontal cortex (IFC). In parallel, the HbR response of the left IFC was significantly increased due to caffeine intake. In line with previous results, we did not detect an effect of caffeine on most aspects of behavior. Effects of caffeine on brain vasculature were detected as general reduction of HbO. Neuronal effects of caffeine are reflected in an increased concentration of HbR in the left hemisphere when performing a verbal memory task and suggest influences on metabolism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 24%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Neuroscience 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 11 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,730,558
of 8,756,523 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,108
of 2,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,079
of 244,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#84
of 176 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,756,523 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,193 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,408 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 176 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.