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Cold applications for recovery in adolescent athletes: a systematic review and meta analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Extreme Physiology & Medicine, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 106)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
50 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
205 Mendeley
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Title
Cold applications for recovery in adolescent athletes: a systematic review and meta analysis
Published in
Extreme Physiology & Medicine, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13728-015-0035-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Murray, Marco Cardinale

Abstract

Recovery and regeneration modalities have been developed empirically over the years to help and support training programmes aimed at maximizing athletic performance. Professional athletes undergo numerous training sessions, characterized by differing modalities of varying volumes and intensities, with the aim of physiological adaptation leading to improved performance. Scientific support to athletes focuses on improving the chances of a training programme producing the largest adaptive response. In competition it is mainly targeted at maximizing the chances of optimal performance and recovery when high performance levels are required repeatedly in quick succession (e.g. heats/finals). In recent years, a lot of emphasis has been put on recovery modalities. In particular, emphasis has been placed on the need to reduce the delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) typically evident following training and competitive activities inducing a certain degree of muscle damage. One of the most used recovery modalities consists of cold-water immersion and/or ice/cold applications to muscles affected by DOMS. While the scientific literature has provided a rationale for such modalities to reduce pain in athletes and recreationally active adults, it is doubtful if this rationale is appropriate to aid training with adolescent athletes. In particular, since these methods have been suggested to potentially impair the muscle remodeling process leading to muscle hypertrophy. While this debate is still active in the literature, many coaches adopt such practices in youth populations, simply transferring what they see in elite sportspeople directly; without questioning the rationale, safety or effectiveness as well as the potential for such activity to reduce the adaptive potential of skeletal muscle remodeling in adolescent athletes. The aim of this review was to assess the current knowledge base on the use of ice/cold applications for recovery purposes in adolescent athletes in order to provide useful guidelines for sports scientists, medical practitioners, physiotherapists and coaches working with such populations as well as developing research questions for further research activities in this area. Based on the current evidence, it seems clear that evidence for acute benefits of such interventions are scarce and more work is needed to ascertain the physiological implications on a pre or peri-pubertal population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 50 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 205 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Qatar 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Croatia 1 <1%
Unknown 198 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 39 19%
Student > Bachelor 33 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 13%
Researcher 22 11%
Other 12 6%
Other 43 21%
Unknown 30 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 91 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 3%
Computer Science 4 2%
Other 15 7%
Unknown 34 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2018.
All research outputs
#731,560
of 19,047,010 outputs
Outputs from Extreme Physiology & Medicine
#11
of 106 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,644
of 263,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Extreme Physiology & Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,047,010 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 106 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,440 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them