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Comparative transcriptomics reveals suppressed expression of genes related to auxin and the cell cycle contributes to the resistance of cucumber against Meloidogyne incognita

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, August 2018
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Title
Comparative transcriptomics reveals suppressed expression of genes related to auxin and the cell cycle contributes to the resistance of cucumber against Meloidogyne incognita
Published in
BMC Genomics, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4979-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xing Wang, Chunyan Cheng, Kaijing Zhang, Zhen Tian, Jian Xu, Shuqiong Yang, Qunfeng Lou, Ji Li, Jin-Feng Chen

Abstract

Meloidogyne incognita is a devastating nematode that causes significant losses in cucumber production worldwide. Although numerous studies have emphasized on the susceptible response of plants after nematode infection, the exact regulation mechanism of M. incognita-resistance in cucumber remains elusive. Verification of an introgression line, 'IL10-1', with M. incognita-resistance provides the opportunity to unravel the resistance mechanism of cucumber against M. incognita. In the present study, analyses of physiological responses and transcriptional events between IL10-1 (resistant line) and CC3 (susceptible line) were conducted after M. incognita infection. Physiological observations showed abnormal development of giant cells and M. incognita in IL10-1, which were the primary differences compared with CC3. Furthermore, Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that genes encoding cell wall proteins were up-regulated in IL10-1 and that the highly expressed lipid transfer protein gene (Csa6G410090) might be the principal regulator of this up-regulation. Simultaneously, analyses of gene expression profiles revealed more auxin-related genes were suppressed in IL10-1 than in those of CC3, which corresponded with the lower level of indole acetic acid (IAA) in the roots of IL10-1 than in those of CC3. Additionally, poor nucleus development as a clear indication of abnormal giant cells in IL10-1 was related to inhibition of the cell cycle. Of those genes related to the cell cycle, the F-box domain Skp2-like genes were down-regulated in IL10-1, whereas more of these genes were up-regulated in CC3. All of these findings indicate that suppressed expression of genes related to auxin and the cell cycle and highly expressed cell wall proteins play important roles in the abnormal development of giant cells, which hinders the development of M. incognita, thereby causing resistance to M. incognita in IL10-1. Knowledge from this research will provide a useful foundation for developing effective strategies in M. incognita-resistance breeding.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 31%
Researcher 7 24%
Student > Master 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 52%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 17%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Unspecified 1 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,617,839
of 13,337,884 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#6,042
of 7,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,028
of 267,789 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#11
of 15 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.