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Substance use disorder treatment retention and completion: a prospective study of horse-assisted therapy (HAT) for young adults

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, October 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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109 Mendeley
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Title
Substance use disorder treatment retention and completion: a prospective study of horse-assisted therapy (HAT) for young adults
Published in
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13722-015-0043-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ann Kern-Godal, Espen Ajo Arnevik, Espen Walderhaug, Edle Ravndal

Abstract

Keeping substance use disorder patients actively engaged in treatment is a challenge. Horse-assisted therapy (HAT) is increasingly used as a complementary therapy, with claimed motivational and other benefits to physical and psychological health. This naturalistic study aimed to assess HAT's impact on the duration and completion of treatment for young substance users at Oslo University Hospital. Discharge and other data were derived from the Youth Addiction Treatment Evaluation Project (YATEP) database for patients (n = 108) admitted during an 18-month period. An intention-to-treat design, and univariate and multivariate analyses were used to compare those receiving treatment as usual (n = 43) with those who received treatment as usual plus HAT (n = 65). Despite a lack of randomization, the baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. However, more HAT participants completed treatment (56.9 vs 14 %, p < 0.001), remained in treatment for longer (mean 141 vs 70 days, p < 0.001) and had a significantly higher chance of completing their treatment than those not given the HAT program. Excluding time in treatment, and after controlling for the potentially confounding influence of age, sex, education, number and severity of substances used, psychological distress and number of temporary exits, the adjusted odds ratio for treatment completion was 8.4 in the HAT group compared with those not participating in HAT (95 % CI 2.7-26.4, p < 0.001). The study found a statistically significant association between HAT participation and time in treatment, and between HAT participation and completion of treatment. This association does not infer causality. However, it adds supporting evidence for the development of an innovative therapy, and warrants investment in further research in relation to its inclusion in substance use disorder treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 107 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 16 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Student > Master 9 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 7%
Researcher 7 6%
Other 22 20%
Unknown 36 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 29 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 35 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2017.
All research outputs
#5,141,815
of 17,455,239 outputs
Outputs from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#156
of 317 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,149
of 259,543 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,455,239 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 317 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,543 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them