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Non-invasive surveillance for Plasmodium in reservoir macaque species

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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71 Mendeley
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Title
Non-invasive surveillance for Plasmodium in reservoir macaque species
Published in
Malaria Journal, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0857-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josephine E. Siregar, Christina L. Faust, Lydia S. Murdiyarso, Lis Rosmanah, Uus Saepuloh, Andrew P. Dobson, Diah Iskandriati

Abstract

Primates are important reservoirs for human diseases, but their infection status and disease dynamics are difficult to track in the wild. Within the last decade, a macaque malaria, Plasmodium knowlesi, has caused disease in hundreds of humans in Southeast Asia. In order to track cases and understand zoonotic risk, it is imperative to be able to quantify infection status in reservoir macaque species. In this study, protocols for the collection of non-invasive samples and isolation of malaria parasites from naturally infected macaques are optimized. Paired faecal and blood samples from 60 Macaca fascicularis and four Macaca nemestrina were collected. All animals came from Sumatra or Java and were housed in semi-captive breeding colonies around West Java. DNA was extracted from samples using a modified protocol. Nested polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were run to detect Plasmodium using primers targeting mitochondrial DNA. Sensitivity of screening faecal samples for Plasmodium was compared to other studies using Kruskal Wallis tests and logistic regression models. The best primer set was 96.7 % (95 % confidence intervals (CI): 83.3-99.4 %) sensitive for detecting Plasmodium  in faecal samples of naturally infected macaques (n = 30). This is the first study to produce definitive estimates of Plasmodium sensitivity and specificity in faecal samples from naturally infected hosts. The sensitivity was significantly higher than some other studies involving wild primates. Faecal samples can be used for detection of malaria infection in field surveys of macaques, even when there are no parasites visible in thin blood smears. Repeating samples from individuals will improve inferences of the epidemiology of malaria in wild primates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Kenya 1 1%
Unknown 70 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 21%
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Student > Master 12 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Other 5 7%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 4%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2015.
All research outputs
#914,380
of 6,258,277 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#326
of 2,279 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,962
of 194,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#12
of 138 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,258,277 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,279 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,757 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 138 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.