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Social disparities in patient safety in primary care: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
30 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
142 Mendeley
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Title
Social disparities in patient safety in primary care: a systematic review
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12939-018-0828-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlotta Piccardi, Jens Detollenaere, Pierre Vanden Bussche, Sara Willems

Abstract

Patient safety is a quality indicator for primary care and it should be based on individual needs, and not differ among different social groups. Nevertheless, the attention on social disparities in patient safety has been mainly directed towards the hospital care, often overlooking the primary care setting. Therefore, this paper aims to synthesise social disparities in patient safety in the primary care setting. The Databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched for relevant studies published between January 1st 2006 and January 31st 2017. Papers investigating racial, gender and socioeconomic disparities in regards to administrative errors, diagnostic errors, medication errors and transition of care errors in primary care were included. No distinction in terms of participants' age was made. Women and black patients are more likely to experience patient safety events in primary care, although it depends on the type of disease, treatment, and healthcare service. The available literature largely describes gender and ethnic disparities in the different patient safety domains whilst income and educational level are studied to a lesser extent. The results of this systematic review suggest that vulnerable social groups are likely to experience adverse patient safety events in primary care. Enhancing family doctors' awareness of these inequities is a necessary first step to tackle them and improve patient safety for all patients. Future research should focus on social disparities in patient safety using socioeconomic indicators, such as income and education.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 142 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 142 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 15%
Researcher 13 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 8%
Student > Bachelor 9 6%
Other 32 23%
Unknown 44 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 15%
Psychology 5 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 3%
Other 13 9%
Unknown 55 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2022.
All research outputs
#1,038,718
of 21,907,648 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#133
of 1,824 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,117
of 300,743 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,907,648 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,824 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,743 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them