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Interaction between non-executive and executive directors in English National Health Service trust boards: an observational study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, October 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Interaction between non-executive and executive directors in English National Health Service trust boards: an observational study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-1127-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rod Sheaff, Ruth Endacott, Ray Jones, Val Woodward

Abstract

National Health Service (NHS) trusts, which provide the majority of hospital and community health services to the English NHS, are increasingly adopting a 'public firm' model with a board consisting of executive directors who are trust employees and external non-executives chosen for their experience in a range of areas such as finance, health care and management. In this paper we compare the non-executive directors' roles and interests in, and contributions to, NHS trust boards' governance activities with those of executive directors; and examine non-executive directors' approach to their role in board meetings. Non-participant observations of three successive trust board meetings in eight NHS trusts (primary care trusts, foundation trusts and self-governing (non-foundation) trusts) in England in 2008-9. The observational data were analysed inductively to yield categories of behaviour reflecting the perlocutionary types of intervention which non-executive directors made in trust meetings. The observational data revealed six main perlocutionary types of questioning tactic used by non-executive directors to executive directors: supportive; lesson-seeking; diagnostic; options assessment; strategy seeking; and requesting further work. Non-executive board members' behaviours in holding the executive team to account at board meetings were variable. Non-executive directors were likely to contribute to finance-related discussions which suggests that they did see financial challenge as a key component of their role. The pattern of behaviours was more indicative of an active, strategic approach to governance than of passive monitoring or 'rubber-stamping'. Nevertheless, additional means of maintaining public accountability of NHS trusts may also be required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 8%
Other 11 29%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Business, Management and Accounting 9 24%
Social Sciences 7 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 13%
Psychology 3 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2021.
All research outputs
#10,599,408
of 18,812,327 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,722
of 6,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,706
of 263,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,812,327 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,322 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,233 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them