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The effect of a community based health promotion intervention to change gender norms among women in a rural community in Sri Lanka

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2018
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1 tweeter

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Title
The effect of a community based health promotion intervention to change gender norms among women in a rural community in Sri Lanka
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5914-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. Herath, D. Guruge, M. Fernando, S. Jayarathna, L. Senarathna

Abstract

Gender norms practiced by respective societies increase the risk of violence by men against women. To date, there is a dearth of research evidence on changing gender norms through health promotion approaches around the globe, including in Sri Lanka. This study provides an evaluation of effectiveness of a health promotion intervention in changing the acceptance of gender norms among women. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in two rural villages in Anuradhapura district in Sri Lanka including women who have a child under five years of age. One village was allocated to receive an intervention developed based on a health promotion approach and the other village was a control. A community based mechanism to question selected gender norms among women was developed as the intervention. The pre- and post-intervention assessments of the level of acceptance of gender norms were done using an interviewer administered questionnaire and by using focus group discussions. Following the intervention, acceptances of prominent gender norms were changed significantly among the women receiving the intervention method. The control group showed no changes towards the acceptance of gender norms during this period. Women in the intervention group had higher levels of self-reported positive behavior changes and greater understanding of gender concepts compared to the control group. The acceptance of gender norms among women in rural villages in Sri Lanka can be changed by a community based intervention targeting gender norms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 136 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 13%
Student > Master 16 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 8%
Researcher 9 7%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 50 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 24 18%
Psychology 15 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 10%
Social Sciences 13 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 51 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,624,133
of 13,347,801 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,894
of 9,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,121
of 267,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#5
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,347,801 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,204 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,902 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.