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Vitamin A depletion induced by cigarette smoke is associated with an increase in lung cancer-related markers in rats

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, October 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Vitamin A depletion induced by cigarette smoke is associated with an increase in lung cancer-related markers in rats
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12929-015-0189-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuan Xue, Ethan Harris, Weiqun Wang, Richard C. Baybutt

Abstract

We have previously demonstrated that cigarette smoke is associated with a significant reduction of retinoic acid in rat lungs and the formation of tracheal precancerous lesions. However, the underlying mechanism of cancer risk induced by vitamin A deficiency is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the cigarette smoke-induced depletion of vitamin A is related to changes in lung cancer risk-related molecular markers. We investigated the roles of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) as well as other biomarkers for potential cancer risk in the lungs of rats exposed to cigarette smoke. Twenty-four male weanling rats were fed a purified diet and divided equally into four groups. Three experimental groups were exposed to increasing doses of cigarette smoke from 20, 40 or 60 commercial cigarettes/day for 5 days/week. After 6 weeks, the retinoic acid concentrations in the lung tissue as measured via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in cigarette smoke exposed groups. Western Blot analysis revealed that cigarette smoke exposure increased lung protein expression of RAR α in a threshold manner and decreased RAR β and RAR γ expression in a dose-dependent fashion. Protein expressions of cyclin E and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in cigarette smoke exposed-groups. Additionally, there was a significant increase in protein expression of cJun and cyclin D1 demonstrating a threshold effect similar to that exhibited by RARα, suggesting a potential independent signaling pathway for RARα in lung carcinogenesis. Findings from this study suggest that cigarette smoke-induced lung retinoic acid depletion may involve two independent pathways, RARα- and RARβ-mediated, responsible for the increased cancer risk associated with cigarette smoke-induced vitamin A deficiency.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 16%
Other 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Professor 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 9 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 16%
Engineering 2 8%
Chemical Engineering 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 9 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2021.
All research outputs
#11,510,087
of 20,083,595 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#487
of 880 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,838
of 266,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,083,595 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 880 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,082 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.