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Citrulline malate supplementation does not improve German Volume Training performance or reduce muscle soreness in moderately trained males and females

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, August 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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50 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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108 Mendeley
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Title
Citrulline malate supplementation does not improve German Volume Training performance or reduce muscle soreness in moderately trained males and females
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12970-018-0245-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew J. Chappell, Daniel M. Allwood, Rebecca Johns, Samantha Brown, Kiran Sultana, Annie Anand, Trevor Simper

Abstract

Use of supplements to aid performance is common practice amongst recreationally active individuals, including those without a sufficient evidence base. This investigation sought to assess whether acute supplementation with 8 g of citrulline malate (CM) (1.11: 1 ratio) would improve anaerobic performance. A randomised double blind placebo control trial was employed, using a counterbalanced design. We recruited recreationally active men and women to take part in an isokinetic chair protocol, based on German Volume Training (GVT) whereby participants attempted to perform 10 sets of 10 repetitions against a force representing 70% of their peak concentric force. The number of repetitions achieved over the course of the GVT was 94.0 ± 7.9 and 90.9 ± 13.9 for placebo and CM respectively. There was no significant difference between the placebo and CM treatment for number of repetitions (P = 0.33), isometric (P = 0.60), concentric (P = 0.38), or eccentric (P = 0.65) peak force following the GVT. Total muscle soreness was significantly higher in the CM compared to the placebo treatment following the GVT protocol over 72 h (P = 0.01); although this was not accompanied by a greater workload/number of repetitions in the CM group. We conclude that an acute dose of CM does not significantly affect anaerobic performance using an isokinetic chair in recreational active participants. Practical implications include precaution in recommending CM supplementation. Coaches and athletes should be aware of the disparity between the chemical analyses of the products reviewed in the present investigation versus the manufacturers' claims.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 50 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 108 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 26 24%
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Researcher 5 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 34 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 27 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Other 7 6%
Unknown 40 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 36. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2021.
All research outputs
#779,002
of 19,281,482 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#215
of 836 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,425
of 291,629 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,281,482 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 836 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,629 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them