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Clinical and pathological significance of ROS1 expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, October 2015
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Title
Clinical and pathological significance of ROS1 expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma
Published in
BMC Cancer, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1737-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kyung-Hun Lee, Kyoung-Bun Lee, Tae-Yong Kim, Sae-Won Han, Do-Youn Oh, Seock-Ah Im, Tae-You Kim, Nam-Joon Yi, Kwang-Woong Lee, Kyung-Suk Suh, Ja-June Jang, Yung-Jue Bang

Abstract

More knowledge about genetic and molecular features of cholangiocarcinoma is needed to develop effective therapeutic strategies. We investigated the clinical and pathological significance of ROS1 expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. One hundred ninety-four patients with curatively resected intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma were included in this study. Tumor tissue specimens were collected and analyzed for ROS1 gene rearrangement using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and ROS1 protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC). ROS1 immunohistochemistry was positive (moderate or strong staining) in 72 tumors (37.1 %). ROS1 protein expression was significantly correlated with well differentiated tumors, papillary or mucinous histology, oncocytic/hepatoid or intestinal type tumors, and periductal infiltrating or intraductal growing tumors (vs. mass-forming cholangiocarcinoma). ROS-expressing tumors were associated with better disease-free survival (30.1 months for ROS1 expression (+) tumors vs. 9.0 months for ROS1 (-) tumors, p = 0.006). Moreover, ROS1 expression was an independent predictor of better disease-free survival in a multivariate analysis (HR 0.607, 95 % CI 0.377-0.976; p = 0.039). Although break-apart FISH was successfully performed in 102 samples, a split pattern indicative of ROS1 gene rearrangement was not found in the examined samples. ROS1 protein expression was associated with well-differentiated histology and better survival in our patients with resected intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. ROS1 gene rearrangement by break-apart FISH was not found in the examined samples.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 20%
Researcher 3 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 15%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 20%
Unspecified 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,042,626
of 7,971,101 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,200
of 3,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,826
of 243,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#134
of 227 outputs
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