↓ Skip to main content

Asymmetric somatic hybridization induces point mutations and indels in wheat

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Asymmetric somatic hybridization induces point mutations and indels in wheat
Published in
BMC Genomics, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1974-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mengcheng Wang, Chun Liu, Tian Xing, Yanxia Wang, Guangmin Xia

Abstract

Allopolyploid genome needs wide structural variation to deal with genomic shock. The introgression line, generated via asymmetric somatic hybridization, is introgressed with a minimum of exogenous chromatin, which also leads to genomic shock to induce genetic variation. However, the extent of its genomic variation and its difference from allopolyploidies remains unknown. Here, we explored this issue using the bread wheat cultivar SR3, a derivative of an asymmetric somatic hybrid between the cultivar JN177 and an accession of tall wheatgrass (Thinopyrum elongatum). The ESTs (expressed sequence taqs) were large-scale sequenced using the cDNA library constructed in each of SR3 and JN177. Point mutations and indels (insertions and deletions) of SR3 were calculated, and their difference from the genetic variation of bread wheat and its ancestors were compared, with aim to analyze the extent and pattern of sequence variation induced by somatic hybridization. Both point mutations and indels (insertions and deletions) were frequently induced by somatic hybridization in the coding sequences. While the genomic shock caused by allopolyploidization tends to favor deletion over insertion, there was no evidence for such a preference following asymmetric somatic hybridization. The GC content of sequence adjacent to indel sites was also distinct from what has been observed in allopolyploids. This study demonstrates that asymmetric somatic hybridization induces high frequency of genetic variation in a manner partially different from allopolipoidization. Asymmetric somatic hybridization provides appropriate material to comprehensively explore the nature of the genetic variation induced by genomic shock.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 23%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Professor 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 54%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 23%
Arts and Humanities 1 8%
Unknown 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,395,633
of 7,976,486 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#2,568
of 5,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,028
of 243,848 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#191
of 398 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,976,486 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,712 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,848 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 398 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.