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Hypoxia alters the recruitment of tropomyosins into the actin stress fibres of neuroblastoma cells

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, October 2015
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Title
Hypoxia alters the recruitment of tropomyosins into the actin stress fibres of neuroblastoma cells
Published in
BMC Cancer, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1741-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joshua J. Glass, Phoebe A. Phillips, Peter W. Gunning, Justine R. Stehn

Abstract

Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. The heterogeneous microenvironment of solid tumors contains hypoxic regions associated with poor prognosis and chemoresistance. Hypoxia implicates the actin cytoskeleton through its essential roles in motility, invasion and proliferation. However, hypoxia-induced changes in the actin cytoskeleton have only recently been observed in human cells. Tropomyosins are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and we hypothesized that tropomyosins may mediate hypoxic phenotypes. Neuroblastoma (SH-EP) cells were incubated ± hypoxia (1 % O2, 5 % CO2) for up to 144 h, before examining the cytoskeleton by confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Hypoxic cells were characterized by a more organized actin cytoskeleton and a reduced ability to degrade gelatin substrates. Hypoxia significantly increased mean actin filament bundle width (72 h) and actin filament length (72-96 h). This correlated with increased hypoxic expression and filamentous organization of stabilizing tropomyosins Tm1 and Tm2. However, isoform specific changes in tropomyosin expression were more evident at 96 h. This study demonstrates hypoxia-induced changes in the recruitment of high molecular weight tropomyosins into the actin stress fibres of a human cancer. While hypoxia induced clear changes in actin organization compared with parallel normoxic cultures of neuroblastoma, the precise role of tropomyosins in this hypoxic actin reorganization remains to be determined.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 29%
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 2 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Computer Science 1 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,049,275
of 7,981,790 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,201
of 3,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,118
of 244,734 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#138
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,981,790 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,407 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.