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Health seeking behaviours among electronic waste workers in Ghana

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
208 Mendeley
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Title
Health seeking behaviours among electronic waste workers in Ghana
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2376-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emmanuel Asampong, Kwaku Dwuma-Badu, Judith Stephens, Roland Srigboh, Richard Neitzel, Niladri Basu, Julius N. Fobil

Abstract

Electronic waste workers are prone to various illnesses and injuries from numerous hazards thus the need for them to seek health care. The aim of this study was to describe health-seeking behavior, and social and other factors affecting this behavior, among electronic waste workers at Agbogbloshie, Accra, Ghana. In-depth interviews were conducted and analyzed qualitatively from a grounded theory perspective. Workers experienced various kinds of ailments. These included physical injuries, chest and respiratory tract associated symptoms, malaria, headaches, body pains and stomach discomfort. They reported seeking health care from multiple sources, and the main determinants of health seeking behaviour were severity of illness, perceived benefit of treatment, accessibility of service, quality of service, ease of communication with service provider and cost of health care. Multiple sources of health care were used by the e-waste workers. As cost was a major barrier to accessing formal health care, most of the workers did not subscribe to health insurance. Since enrollment in health insurance is low amongst the workers, education campaigns on the need to register with the National Health Insurance Scheme would facilitate access to formal health care and could result in improved health outcomes among e-waste workers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 208 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Bangladesh 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 206 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 53 25%
Student > Bachelor 29 14%
Researcher 18 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 8%
Other 34 16%
Unknown 40 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 13%
Social Sciences 24 12%
Environmental Science 23 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 10 5%
Other 41 20%
Unknown 52 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2021.
All research outputs
#5,866,066
of 19,862,278 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,212
of 12,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,467
of 298,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#511
of 1,134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,862,278 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.